In Pictures: Rights to carry guns openly causes stir at US Republican convention

Jaimes Campbell, an advocate for open carry, stands with a gun as police walk by in Cleveland Public Square outside the Republican National Convention on July 19, 2016.
Jaimes Campbell, an advocate for open carry, stands with a gun as police walk by in Cleveland Public Square outside the Republican National Convention on July 19, 2016.PHOTO: REUTERS

CLEVELAND, OHIO (Reuters) - Even gun rights advocates are questioning whether people should be allowed to carry rifles and handguns during protests at this week’s Republican National Convention in Cleveland in the wake of the shootings of six police officers in Baton Rouge.


A woman holds up a pro gun sign near the sight of the Republican National Convention (RNC) in downtown Cleveland on the second day of the convention on July 19, 2016 in Cleveland, Ohio. PHOTO: AFP


A Donald Trump supporter poses with a gun while attending a rally for Donald Trump on the first day of the Republican National Convention on July 18, 2016 in Cleveland, Ohio. PHOTO: AFP


A Donald Trump supporter poses with a gun while attending a rally for Donald Trump on the first day of the Republican National Convention on July 18, 2016 in Cleveland, Ohio. PHOTO: AFP


A man holds a sign supporting guns outside the Republican National Convention in Cleveland, Ohio on July 19, 2016. PHOTO: REUTERS


Journalists talk with a man openly carrying a gun in downtown on the first day of the Republican National Convention on July 18, 2016 in Cleveland, Ohio. PHOTO: AFP

Backers as well as opponents of presumptive Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump have expressed concerns about the prospect of weapons being carried in open sight around the convention site.


Steve Thacker (centre), a member of a group supporting the carrying of weapons, openly speaks to the media at an open carry event on July 17, 2016 in Cleveland, Ohio. PHOTO: REUTERS

Ohio is among the states that allow licensed gun owners to carry their weapons in public, and gun rights activists, particularly in Texas, have taken to expressing that right often in large-scale events. 


A sign on a door forbids people from carrying guns into a public building on July 17, 2016 in Cleveland, Ohio. PHOTO: AFP