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Hillary Clinton was the choice of Asian Americans for US president

Former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton delivers remarks while being honoured during the Children's Defense Fund's Beat the Odds Celebration at the Newseum on Nov 16, 2016.
Former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton delivers remarks while being honoured during the Children's Defense Fund's Beat the Odds Celebration at the Newseum on Nov 16, 2016.PHOTO: AFP

WASHINGTON - President-elect Donald Trump may have won the election but he was not the choice of the Asian community in the United States, who strongly voted for Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton.

On a national scale, the Republican Party's support from Asian Americans has been on the decline over the years and slipped even further in this presidential election.

According to a preliminary survey by national civil rights organisation, Asian American League Defence Education Fund (AALDEF), 79 per cent of Asian Americans backed Mrs Clinton, while 17 per cent voted for Mr Trump.

In 2012, 77 per cent of Asian Americans voted for President Barack Obama, while 21 per cent voted for Republican nominee Mitt Romney.

Asian Americans are the fastest growing demographic in the US, but up till now, they have been less politically active than other groups such as the whites, blacks and Hispanics.

As of 2015, Asian Americans form 5.6 per cent of the population, according to the US Census Bureau.

But what is also worth noting from the AALDEF report is that the Republican Party is getting an increased amount of support in crucial battleground states.

For example, in Pennsylvania, Mr Trump received 12 per cent of the vote of Asian Americans, up from Mr Romney's 9 per cent in 2012.

Also in Nevada, Mr Trump got 29 per cent of the Asian American vote, up from 18 per cent for Mr Romney.

"Our gains in the Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders (AAPI) communities in key battleground states across the country are a testament to the leadership of Republican National Committee (RNC) chairman Reince Priebus, and the RNC's commitment to engaging AAPI communities where they work, live, worship and play," said RNC spokesman Ninio Fetalvo.

He also pointed out that in a CNN poll, Mrs Clinton in fact did worse among Asian Americans than Mr Obama, getting only 65 per cent of their vote, down from 73 per cent.

Even though it was predominantly the white vote that swung this year's election towards Mr Trump, the Republican Party says it will continue to court Asian voters.

"Our party will continue to work with AAPI communities to ensure their voices are heard in our political process," said Mr Fetalvo.