Hillary Clinton presses 'stronger together' message to Americans in Democratic nomination speech

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton delivering remarks during the fourth day of the Democratic National Convention at the Wells Fargo Center, July 28 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton delivering remarks during the fourth day of the Democratic National Convention at the Wells Fargo Center, July 28 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. PHOTO: AFP
Hillary Clinton gives the thumbs-up at the end of the fourth and final night of the Democratic National Convention.
Hillary Clinton gives the thumbs-up at the end of the fourth and final night of the Democratic National Convention. PHOTO: AFP

WASHINGTON - Mrs Hillary Clinton drove home the message that Americans are stronger together as she accepted the nomination for president of the United States on the last day of the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia.

"Stronger together is not just a lesson from our history, it's not just a slogan for our campaign, it's a guiding principal for the country we have always been and the future we are going to build," she told the thousands gathered at the Wells Fargo Centre on Thursday (July 28).

While laying out her plans in all areas, from immigration reform and national security to creating jobs and ensuring equal pay for men and women, Mrs Clinton constantly attacked Mr Trump for his empty promises and his attempt to sow fear and discord.

"He wants us to fear the future and fear each other," said the former Secretary of State.

But instead of playing on the fears of a nation, she focused on the strengths of America with its diverse and dynamic population, tolerant and generous young people, and enduring values of freedom, justice and opportunity.

America is "clear eyed about what our country is up against, but we are not afraid, we will rise to the challenge just as we always have," she said.

Rebutting Mr Trump's claim that "he alone" could fix America's problems, Mrs Clinton added: "Americans don't say I alone can fix it, we say, we'll fix it together."

She then went on to acknowledge some of the ordinary Americans she has met over her years as a public servant, and how they have inspired her to keep fighting for change.

"With your help, I will carry all your voices and stories with me to the White House," she said.

Acknowledging that she often comes across as a policy wonk, unable to connect with people, she added: "So it's true I sweat the details of policy, because it's not just a detail if it's your kids, if it's your family. It's a big deal and it should be a big deal to your president too."

Looking forward, she said her "primary mission as president will be to create more good jobs and opportunities".

 
 

She also emphasised her belief that America's "democracy isn't working the way it should" and that the 2010 Supreme Court ruling that loosened restrictions on campaign donations from corporations should be overturned to take corporate money out of politics.

Reaching out to Mr Bernie Sanders' supporters, Mrs Clinton talked about working to make college education "free for the middle class and debt free for all".

Perhaps her most salient criticism of Mr Trump was made when she spoke about his character and ability to lead when it comes to issues of national security.

"He loses his cool at the slightest provocation. Imagine him in the oval office facing a real crisis, a man you can bait with a Tweet is not a man we can trust with nuclear weapons," she warned.

Offering her presidency as an antidote to the mean-spirited and divisive Trump campaign, she said: "America is great because America is good."

"Donald Trump is not offering real change, he is offering empty promises. And what are we offering? A bold agenda to improve the lives of people across our country, to keep you safe, to get you good jobs, to give your kids the opportunities they deserve," Mrs Clinton said as the crowd cheered in approval.

"The choice is clear my friends, every generation of Americans has come together to make our country freer, fairer and stronger, none of us ever have or can do it alone," she added.