Hillary Clinton makes history as Democratic presidential nominee

Playing the woman card to be Madam President? Clinton says 'deal me in.'
Mrs Hillary Clinton's camp is now looking to unite the Democratic Party's factions.
Mrs Hillary Clinton's camp is now looking to unite the Democratic Party's factions.PHOTO: REUTERS
Mr Bernie Sanders (right) smiles during roll call on the second day of the Democratic National Convention at the Wells Fargo Centre in Philadelphia.
Mr Bernie Sanders (right) smiles during roll call on the second day of the Democratic National Convention at the Wells Fargo Centre in Philadelphia.PHOTO: AFP
The New York delegation cast their votes during roll call along with (Center L-R) New York City Mayor Bill De Blasio, Sen. Chuck Schumer (D-NY), Rep. Charles Rangel (D-NY), New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo, and Sen.
The New York delegation cast their votes during roll call along with (Center L-R) New York City Mayor Bill De Blasio, Sen. Chuck Schumer (D-NY), Rep. Charles Rangel (D-NY), New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo, and Sen. PHOTO: AFP
The New York delegation cast their votes during roll call.
The New York delegation cast their votes during roll call.PHOTO: AFP
Delegates hold signs in support of Democratic US presidential nominee Hillary Clinton at the Democratic National Convention.
Delegates hold signs in support of Democratic US presidential nominee Hillary Clinton at the Democratic National Convention. PHOTO: REUTERS

PHILADELPHIA  -  After a protracted primary race, former secretary of state Hillary Clinton is officially the Democratic party's nominee for President - the first time a woman has been picked by a major party in the United States. 

On the floor of the Democratic National Convention (DNC) in Philadelphia, Mrs Clinton received 2,842 votes while her former rival Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders received 1,865 votes. 

A total of 2,383 delegates were needed for a candidate to become the party's nominee. 

"History," Mrs Clinton posted on her Twitter account. 

The roll call vote was conducted on Tuesday night US time (Wednesday morning Singapore time), the second day of the convention at the Wells Fargo Centre, with Mr Sanders' supporters making a final show of support for their chosen candidate. 

Loud chants in support of Mr Sanders were heard as the nominating and seconding speeches were made about how Mr Sanders had started "a movement of love" and how his revolution would continue. 

 
 

But Mrs Clinton's supporters were not to be outdone, generally

drowning out Sanders supporters during the roll call, when each state casts its votes. 

Back in 2008, Mrs Clinton had halted the roll call vote midway through, requesting that then Illinois senator Barack Obama be approved by acclamation, or voice vote. 

This time, it was Mr Sanders' state of Vermont that passed on casting its vote but later, after all states had cast their votes, Mr Sanders requested to nominate Mrs Clinton through a voice vote - another show of unity which echoed his speech on Monday night when he strongly endorsed Mrs Clinton. 

When the voice vote went to Mrs Clinton, the crowd cheered and danced as the screens lit up with the words "2016 Democratic Nominee Hillary Clinton". 

Mrs Clinton is expected to make her acceptance speech on Thursday US time, the last day of the convention.

 

After her official nomination on Tuesday, Mr Bill Clinton took to the stage to endorse his wife as the next president.

The 69-year-old former president portrayed his wife as a change-maker and long-time fighter for social justice.

“This woman has never been satisfied with the status quo in anything. She always wants to move the ball forward, that is just who she is,” he said.

He also spoke about their courtship in his 45-minute speech.  “I asked her to take a walk with me to the Yale Art Museum. We’ve been walking and talking and laughing together ever since.” 

The Democratic party was thrown into disarray just before the start of the convention after troves of leaked e-mails showed party staff tried to undermine Mr Sanders' campaign for presidency. The Clinton campaign blamed the leak on Russian hackers whom it said were bent on helping Republican nominee Donald Trump. 

The convention got off to a nightmare start on Monday for Mrs Clinton, as delegates upset with the treatment of Mr Sanders filled the first day with just the sort of yelling, bickering and heckling the party had tried so hard to avoid.

In the process, it made clear that the Democratic Party is no more immune to divisions than its Republican rivals and served as a reminder that winning in November will not be easy for either candidate.

The mood, however, shifted slightly on Tuesday, as Sanders supporters often chanted his name but did not jeer when Mrs Clinton's name was mentioned. 

The message of unity continued after the roll call vote, as mothers of children who were killed by law enforcement or gun violence took the stage to share their stories.  

Actresses Lena Dunham and America Ferrera also made a speech together declaring that "love trumps hate".