US car crash test highlights different safety standards

A 2016 Nissan Versa (left) and a 2015 Nissan Tsuru collide in a controlled crash test at the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety facility in Ruckersville, Virginia on Oct 27, 2016.
A 2016 Nissan Versa (left) and a 2015 Nissan Tsuru collide in a controlled crash test at the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety facility in Ruckersville, Virginia on Oct 27, 2016.PHOTO: REUTERS
A damaged 2015 Nissan Tsuru after a controlled crash test at the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety facility in Ruckersville, Virginia on Oct 27, 2016.
A damaged 2015 Nissan Tsuru after a controlled crash test at the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety facility in Ruckersville, Virginia on Oct 27, 2016. PHOTO: REUTERS
A damaged 2016 Nissan Versa after a controlled crash test at the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety facility in Ruckersville, Virginia on Oct 27, 2016.
A damaged 2016 Nissan Versa after a controlled crash test at the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety facility in Ruckersville, Virginia on Oct 27, 2016.PHOTO: REUTERS

VIRGINIA (REUTERS) - Two Nissans went head to head to prove a point.

US auto safety advocates say there have been needless deaths due to different safety standards across different markets.

The 2016 Nissan Versa is sold in the US and rated 5 stars, while the "zero star" rated 2015 Nissan Tsuru is sold in Mexico.

The Versa fared significantly better in this test, causing concern about vehicle safety regulations in some Latin American vehicle safety regulations.

"Why are they selling more dangerous cars, the same model or under a different name in Brazil, or Mexico or elsewhere? Because they can get away with it, because the regulations are non-existent or they're weak, for airbag installation, for example. And because they can get away with it, they inflict a double standard on innocent life in those third world countries," said consumer auto safety advocate Ralph Nader.

Nissan announced that they will take the "zero star" rated Tsuru out of production next May.

The Global New Car Assessment Program is currently campaigning to rid all zero star cars from the international market.