Top trainer, owner charged in Australian horse-racing

SYDNEY (AP) - One of Australia's top thoroughbred horse trainers and a prominent owner have been charged in relation to a race April 27 at Sydney's Randwick when a second favourite placed second-last in a race, prompting a stewards inquiry.

Gai Waterhouse and John Singleton, the trainer and owner, respectively, of mare More Joyous, were charged Monday following testimony at a Racing New South Wales inquiry that heard from former rugby league star Andrew Johns and brothel owner Eddie Hayson.

Waterhouse was charged with failing to report "any condition or occurrence that may affect the running of a horse in a race," chief steward Ray Murrihy said.

She was also charged with failing to keep a record of treatments administered to a horse.

Singleton was charged over his public outburst following the race.