Stopping them dead in their tracks

Tourists viewing the corpse flower at the United States Botanic Garden in Washington, DC on Tuesday. The flower is known for its smell, which is often compared to rotting meat. It is expected to bloom for 24 to 48 hours before collapsing. The plant,
PHOTO: AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE

Tourists viewing the corpse flower at the United States Botanic Garden in Washington, DC on Tuesday.

The flower is known for its smell, which is often compared to rotting meat. It is expected to bloom for 24 to 48 hours before collapsing.

The plant, titan arum (Amorphophallus titanium), is native to Sumatra, Indonesia.

A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on August 04, 2016, with the headline 'Stopping them dead in their tracks'. Print Edition | Subscribe