Barack Obama arrives in Cuba as first US president to visit in 88 years

US President Barack Obama and his wife Michelle exit Air Force One as they arrive at Havana's international airport for a three-day trip, in Havana on March 20, 2016.
US President Barack Obama and his wife Michelle exit Air Force One as they arrive at Havana's international airport for a three-day trip, in Havana on March 20, 2016.PHOTO: REUTERS
US President Barack Obama and his wife Michelle approach Cuba's foreign minister Bruno Rodriguez (left) as they arrive at Havana's international airport for a three-day trip, in Havana on March 20, 2016.
US President Barack Obama and his wife Michelle approach Cuba's foreign minister Bruno Rodriguez (left) as they arrive at Havana's international airport for a three-day trip, in Havana on March 20, 2016. PHOTO: REUTERS
US President Barack Obama (centre) waves as he and his wife Michelle walk into a room with the US ambassador to Cuba, Jeffrey DeLaurentis (left), soon after the Obamas arrived in Cuba for a three-day trip, in Havana on March 20, 2016.
US President Barack Obama (centre) waves as he and his wife Michelle walk into a room with the US ambassador to Cuba, Jeffrey DeLaurentis (left), soon after the Obamas arrived in Cuba for a three-day trip, in Havana on March 20, 2016. PHOTO: REUTERS
US President Barack Obama waves after his arrival on Jose Marti Airport in Havana, Cuba, on March 20, 2016.
US President Barack Obama waves after his arrival on Jose Marti Airport in Havana, Cuba, on March 20, 2016. PHOTO: EPA
A tourist poses for a picture with a sign placed at the entrance of a restaurant with the images of Cuban and US Presidents Raul Castro and Barack Obama in Havana, Cuba on March 19, 2016.
A tourist poses for a picture with a sign placed at the entrance of a restaurant with the images of Cuban and US Presidents Raul Castro and Barack Obama in Havana, Cuba on March 19, 2016.PHOTO: AFP

HAVANA (REUTERS) – US President Barack Obama arrived in Cuba on Sunday (March 20) on a historic visit, opening a new chapter in US engagement with the island’s Communist government after decades of animosity between the former Cold War foes. 

Obama landed at Havana’s Jose Marti International Airport aboard Air Force One, the presidential jet with “United States of America” emblazoned across its fuselage, a sight almost unimaginable before the detente of December 2014. 

The three-day trip, the first by a US president to Cuba in 88 years, is the culmination of a diplomatic opening announced by Obama and Cuban President Raul Castro in December 2014, ending a Cold War-era estrangement that began when the Cuban revolution ousted a pro-American government in 1959. 

“It’s a historic opportunity to engage directly with the Cuban people,” Obama told staff at the newly reopened US Embassy who were gathered at a hotel, his first stop after arriving in the afternoon.  

Groups of Cubans watched the motorcade from balconies and backyards as Obama was driven downtown, where a small crowd of Cubans braved a tropical downpour and tight security. They chanted “Viva Obama, Viva Fidel” as the president and his family left after eating dinner in a rundown neighbourhood. 

Obama, who abandoned a longtime US policy of trying to isolate Cuba, wants to make his shift irreversible. But major obstacles remain to full normalisation of ties, and Obama’s critics at home say the visit is premature. 

Travelling with first lady Michelle Obama, her mother and their daughters, Sasha and Malia, the president will mostly play tourist on his first night on the Caribbean island, taking in the famous sights of Old Havana. 

 
 
 

He will hold talks with Raul Castro – but not his brother Fidel, the revolutionary leader – and speak to entrepreneurs on Monday. He meets privately with dissidents, addresses Cubans live on state-run media and attends an exhibition baseball game on Tuesday. 

The trip carries both symbolism and substance after decades of hostility between Washington and Havana. 

It makes Obama the first sitting American president to visit Cuba since Calvin Coolidge arrived on a battleship in 1928.  It is also another major step in chipping away at remaining barriers to US-Cuba trade and travel and developing more normal relations between Washington and Havana. 

Since rapprochement, the two sides have restored diplomatic ties and signed commercial deals on telecommunications and scheduled airline service.  Major differences remain, notably the 54-year-old economic embargo of Cuba.

Obama has asked Congress to rescind it, but the move has been blocked by the Republican leadership. 

Underscoring the ideological divide that persists between Washington and Havana, Cuban police, backed by hundreds of pro-government demonstrators, broke up the regular march of a leading dissident group, the Ladies in White, detaining about 50 people just hours before Obama was due to arrive.

Plainclothes police blanketed the capital with security, while public works crews busily laid down asphalt in a city where drivers joke they must navigate “potholes with streets.”

Welcome signs with images of Obama alongside Raul Castro popped up in colonial Old Havana, which the president and his family will tour later on Sunday. 

Obama has used executive authority to loosen trade and travel restrictions to advance his outreach to Cuba, one of his top foreign policy priorities along with the Iran nuclear deal. 

But Cuba still complains about the occupation of the naval base at Guantanamo Bay, which Obama has said is not up for discussion, as well as US support for dissidents and anti-communist radio and TV programs beamed into Cuba. 

Speaking to reporters, Foreign Trade and Foreign Investment minister Rodrigo Malmierca Díaz said Obama’s regulatory moves “go in the right direction.”

But he added: “We can’t reach a normalisation of relations with the blockade still in effect and without resolving other themes of high importance.”

MAKING ENGAGEMENT IRREVERSIBLE

The Americans in turn criticise one-party rule and repression of political opponents, an issue that aides said Obama would address publicly and privately. 

The Ladies in White and their male supporters protested after a Palm Sunday service and were pulled into police vans after they sat down to block a street. A similar scene plays out every Sunday, but this time it was more intense than usual.

The government dismisses the dissidents, who are funded by US interests, as mercenaries seeking to destabilise the country. 

Obama’s critics at home accuse him of making too many concessions for too little in return from the Cuban government and of using his trip to take an unearned “victory lap.”

But Obama’s more practical goal is to do everything he can to make sure his Cuba engagement cannot be rolled back, even if a Republican wins the White House in the Nov 8 election. 

Although general US tourism to the island is still officially banned under the embargo, a sign of changing times was the presence of groups of US travellers marveling at the vintage American cars rumbling through the streets. 

Little progress on the main issues is expected when Obama and Castro meet on Monday or at a state dinner that evening.  Instead, the highlights are likely to be Obama’s speech on live Cuban television on Tuesday, when he will also meet dissidents and attend an exhibition baseball game between Major League Baseball’s Tampa Bay Rays and Cuba’s national team. 

Underlining Obama’s political challenge at home, the office of U.S. Representative Ed Royce, Republican chairman of the House Foreign Affairs Committee, said the president’s policy “has only served to prop up the communist Castro regime.”