Stories of lives lost in a disaster

EgyptAir flight attendant Samar Ezz el-Deen was newly married. One of the first victims to be named, she had studied modern languages at the Ain Shams University in Cairo.
EgyptAir flight attendant Samar Ezz el-Deen was newly married. One of the first victims to be named, she had studied modern languages at the Ain Shams University in Cairo.

Fifty-six passengers, including three children, were on board Flight 804 from Paris to Cairo, along with three EgyptAir security officers and seven crew members.

According to a list of passengers' nationalities released by the Egyptian government, 30 of the passengers were Egyptian and 15 were from France. The remainder came from countries such as Algeria, Belgium, Britain, Canada, Chad, Iraq, Kuwait, Portugal, Saudi Arabia and Sudan. Here is a closer look at some of those aboard.

THE ECONOMIST

Mr Masharei al-Sohaili said his uncle, Kuwaiti economist Abdel Mohsen al-Sohaili, was supposed to come to Cairo for a three-day break.

"He was happy to come," he said. "He had his two kids - both disabled."

THE FLIGHT ATTENDANT

Ms Samar Ezz el-Deen, a flight attendant, was newly married, according to her relative Mervat Moamen, who was among those waiting anxiously for more information at Cairo Airport.

Ms Deen, who studied modern languages at the Ain Shams University in Cairo, was among the first victims to be named. Reports yesterday said she had once uploaded an image on Facebook of an air stewardess pulling her suitcase from the water as an aircraft plummeted behind her into the sea. `

THE CIVIL ENGINEER

Portuguese officials confirmed that Mr Joao Silva, 61, a father of four and a civil engineer based in Johannesburg, was aboard the plane.

He was in charge of African markets for Mota-Engil, an infrastructure and construction company.

THE COMPANY DIRECTOR

Mr Ahmed Helal, the head of a Procter & Gamble facility in Amiens, in northern France, was on the flight.

Regional radio station France Bleu Picardie said that Mr Helal, 40, a native of Egypt, had been a director at the consumer products giant in Amiens since June 2014, and that he managed 1,000 people at the site, which produces detergents.

THE STUDENT

A Chadian student, who was training at France's prestigious military academy, Saint-Cyr, was a passenger on the doomed EgyptAir plane, said the protocol officer for Chad's embassy in Paris, Mr Muhammed Allamine.

Reports said the man, who was not identified, was on his way home after his mother's death.

THE PHOTOGRAPHER

Mr Pascal Hess, a photographer from Evreux in the north of France who covered rock concerts and had a passion for volleyball, had lost his passport just days before the flight.

"It is crazy but he hesitated about going. He didn't know whether he should go or not," a relative, who was not named, told La Depeche, a regional newspaper. The paper said Mr Hess was on his way to a resort on the Red Sea to join a friend who worked as a dive instructor.

THE GEOLOGIST

Mr Richard Osman, the sole British citizen on the ill-fated plane, was travelling to Egypt for work, said his younger brother, Alastair. The older Mr Osman's French-born wife, Aurelie, 36, had given birth to his second child, on April 27.

"Richard was so happy at the birth of his second daughter, and yet two weeks later, he is no longer with us - it is an absolute tragedy," his brother was quoted as saying.

NEW YORK TIMES, THE GUARDIAN

A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on May 21, 2016, with the headline 'Stories of lives lost in a disaster'. Print Edition | Subscribe