ISIS urges new attacks after Charlie Hebdo killings

A man identified by a lawyer as Cherif Kouachi, one of the two brothers who killed 12 people in the attack on the weekly paper Charlie Hebdo in Paris, is seen in this still image taken from Reuters TV video shot in March 2008 at a Paris courthouse wh
A man identified by a lawyer as Cherif Kouachi, one of the two brothers who killed 12 people in the attack on the weekly paper Charlie Hebdo in Paris, is seen in this still image taken from Reuters TV video shot in March 2008 at a Paris courthouse while facing charges of helping smuggle Islamist fighters into Iraq. -- PHOTO: REUTERS

BEIRUT (AFP) - The Islamic State in Iraq and Syria (ISISI) terrorist group Monday urged Muslims to carry out new attacks after the targeting of France's satirical Charlie Hebdo magazine, in a recording by its spokesman posted online.

Abu Mohamed al-Adnani, referring to attacks in France, Australia, Canada and Belgium, urged "Muslims in Europe and the infidel West to attack the Crusaders where they are".

"We promise that in the Christian bastions they will continue to live in a state of alert, of terror, of fear and insecurity... You have seen nothing yet," the recording said.

He added that the group would consider as "enemies" those Muslims who were able to carry out such attacks but failed to do so.

The threat is just the latest instance in which the terror group has urged Muslims to carry out attacks in the West.

It comes after 17 people were killed in deadly assaults on January 7 to January 9 in Paris against Charlie Hebdo magazine and a kosher supermarket.

Of the three attackers, only one appeared to have pledged allegiance to the ISIS, but the group endorsed the killings in the message.

It also made reference to attacks last year in Australia, Canada and Belgium.

Western intelligence agencies have regularly raised the alarm about the possibility that Western sympathisers of ISIS and other extremists could carry out attacks in the West.

Their concerns have been heightened by the thousands of Western recruits who have flocked to Syria and Iraq to fight alongside extremist groups.