Beirut's garbage problem solved? Rubbish

Only six months after the Lebanese capital's long-running waste crisis supposedly came to an end, piles of garbage are again clogging the streets of Beirut. In March, the government announced a temporary three-year plan to clear the refuse, which inc
PHOTO: AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE

Only six months after the Lebanese capital's long-running waste crisis supposedly came to an end, piles of garbage are again clogging the streets of Beirut.

In March, the government announced a temporary three-year plan to clear the refuse, which included the reopening of two already-closed landfills and the establishment of waste treatment facilities, reported Al Jazeera News.

But most of those promises have not been met and rubbish is once again piling up in Beirut, posing a threat to the residents' health and the environment.

The capital's trash woes began when the authorities shut the main landfill site for Beirut's garbage in July last year without an alternative site in place.

Uncollected rubbish started to pile up, choking the city's streets and sparking violent protests that led to the army being deployed.

Rubbish was later taken off the streets to makeshift dumps, and the country's largest landfill was temporarily reopened.

A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on September 26, 2016, with the headline 'Beirut's garbage problem solved? Rubbish'. Print Edition | Subscribe