May rejects talk of "hard Brexit", says UK's options not binary

British Prime Minister, Theresa May (4-L) chairs a meeting of the Joint Ministerial Committee, which is also attended by Scottish First Minister Nicola Sturgeon (6-R) , Welsh First Minister Carwyn Jones (4-R), and Northern Irish First Minister Arlene
British Prime Minister, Theresa May (4-L) chairs a meeting of the Joint Ministerial Committee, which is also attended by Scottish First Minister Nicola Sturgeon (6-R) , Welsh First Minister Carwyn Jones (4-R), and Northern Irish First Minister Arlene Foster (2-R) and deputy First Minister of Northern Ireland, Martin McGuinness (R) in London, Britain, 24 October 2016. PHOTO: EPA

LONDON (Reuters) - British Prime Minister Theresa May said on Monday (Oct 24) it was not accurate to suggest that Britain was headed for a "hard Brexit" because it does not face a binary choice between curbing immigration and getting a good trade deal with the EU.

When an opposition Labour lawmaker suggested to May she had been "talking up" a so-called hard Brexit, in which Britain leaves the EU's lucrative single market in order to impose controls on immigration, she said: "There is no suggestion of that whatsoever." "We are going to be ambitious for what we obtain for the United Kingdom and that means a good trade deal as well as control of immigration," she told parliament.

Asked by another lawmaker about a report in the Sunday Times that the government was considering halving the headline rate of corporation tax if the EU refuses to agree a post-Brexit free trade deal, May told him he "shouldn't believe everything he reads in newspapers."