Lobster with Pepsi logo 'tattoo' found in Canada, sparking fears over ocean litter

A lobster has been caught in Canada with a Pepsi logo tattooed on its claw, sparking concerns over the amount of litter in the world's oceans.
A lobster has been caught in Canada with a Pepsi logo tattooed on its claw, sparking concerns over the amount of litter in the world's oceans. PHOTO: KARISSA LINDSTRAND

A lobster has been caught in Canada with a Pepsi logo tattooed on its claw, sparking concerns over the amount of litter in the world's oceans.

The find was made by lobster fisherman Karissa Lindstrand - who has been in the business for four years - onboard a boat called Honour Bound on Nov 21, according to CBC News.

The lobster was being loaded onto a crate in the waters off Grand Manan, New Brunswick, when Ms Lindstrand noticed it.

An avid Pepsi fan who drinks up to 12 cans of the fizzy beverage daily, Ms Lindstrand immediately identified it.

None of the boat's crew had seen something like that before, and now over a week on, there is still debate over how it ended up there.

There are some netizens who believe the lobster grew up around a can that had ended up at the ocean floor. However, Ms Lindstrand said it could not have come from a can as the image was pixelated, reported The Guardian.

Another suggested explanation was that part of a Pepsi box had been stuck on the lobster. Ms Lindstrand refutes this as the image on a Pepsi box would be larger than what she saw on the claw.

 

She took a picture of the crustacean, before placing it back into a crate with the other lobsters for sale.

"I'm still trying to wrap my brain around what exactly it was," she told The Guardian.

There has been growing fear over the amount of litter in the world's oceans, with between five million to 13 million tonnes of plastic leaking in annually. They are then ingested by fish and sea birds.

Researchers recently found about 38 million pieces of plastic, weighing almost 18 tonnes, washed up on an uninhabited coral atoll in the eastern South Pacific - one of the world's most remote places.