Libya says will bomb N.Korean ship if it exports seized oil

TRIPOLI (REUTERS) - Libya threatened on Saturday to bomb a North Korean-flagged tanker if it tries to export oil from a rebel-controlled port east of Tripoli, in a major escalation of a standoff over the country's petroleum wealth.

The rebels, who have seized three major ports since August to demand more autonomy, warned Tripoli against staging an attack to halt the oil sale after the tanker docked at Es Sider export terminal.

The oil standoff is one part of deepening turmoil in the North African OPEC member, where the government is struggling to control militias who helped topple Muammar Gaddafi in 2011 but kept their weapons and are challenging state authority.

A local television station controlled by protesters showed footage of pro-autonomy rebels holding a lengthy ceremony and slaughtering a camel to celebrate their first oil shipment.

In the distance, a tanker could be seen at what the station said was Es Sider, one of Libya's biggest export terminals.

Prime Minister Ali Zeidan appeared hours later on several television channels to warn the tanker's crew.

"The tanker will be bombed if it doesn't follow orders when leaving (the port). This will be an environmental disaster," Zeidan said.

"They are now trying to load oil," he said, denouncing it as a criminal act. Authorities have ordered the arrest of the tanker's crew.

There was no immediate sign of the country's nascent armed forces moving towards the port.

Analysts say the military, still in training, would struggle to confront rebels battle-hardened from the eight-month uprising against Gaddafi.

"We tried to reach a deal with the government, but they and parliament ... were too busy with themselves and didn't even discuss our demands," Abb-Rabbo Albarassi, self-declared prime minister of Libya's eastern autonomy movement, told the station.

"If anyone attacks, we will respond to that." Officials at state-run National Oil Corp (NOC) confirmed the North Korean-flagged tanker had docked, but it was unclear whether the vessel had loaded any crude.

Any independent shipment would be a blow to the government.

Tripoli had said it would destroy tankers trying to buy oil from Ibrahim Jathran, a former anti-Gaddafi rebel who seized the port and two others with thousands of his men in August.

Jathran had commanded a brigade of former rebels paid by the state to protect petroleum facilities. He defected with his troops, however, to take over the ports.

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