World's youngest Nobel Prize winner Malala Yousafzai to attend Oxford for 'degree that runs Britain'

Education rights activist and Nobel Peace Prize laureate Malala Yousafzai tweets her delight at being given a place at Oxford University.
Malala Yousafzai is congratulated after collecting her 'A' level exam results at Edgbaston High School for Girls in Birmingham, Britain, on Aug 17, 2017.
Malala Yousafzai is congratulated after collecting her 'A' level exam results at Edgbaston High School for Girls in Birmingham, Britain, on Aug 17, 2017. PHOTO: REUTERS

LONDON - Ms Malala Yousafzai is going to Oxford.

Ms Yousafzai, the 20-year-old Pakistani-born activist who is the world's youngest Nobel laureate, on Thursday (Aug 17) tweeted a screenshot of her acceptance to the university.

"So excited to go to Oxford!! Well done to all A-level students - the hardest year. Best wishes for life ahead!" she wrote on Twitter.

In March, Ms Yousafzai received a conditional offer from Oxford's Lady Margaret Hall, contingent on her exam results. Pakistan's first female prime minister, Ms Benazir Bhutto, also studied at Lady Margaret Hall in the 1970s.

Ms Yousafzai said she would be studying philosophy, politics and economics, or PPE, which The Guardian called "the Oxford degree that runs Britain".

The news that she would be attending one of the world's leading universities came at the beginning of a frenetic, roller-coaster season for students in England, Wales and Northern Ireland, who on Thursday were receiving the results of A-level exams that could decide their futures in higher education.

Students were learning whether their grades met the standard set by their chosen universities, or were entering a process known as "clearing" to try to find an open spot at another institution.

Ms Yousafzai was 15 when a Taleban gunman in Pakistan shot her in the head for her work advocating girls' education. At the time, she had been blogging for the BBC about life under the grip of the terrorist group after an edict by the militants in 2008 banned girls from attending school.

In 2014, Ms Yousafzai was flown to Britain for medical treatment and reconstructive surgery. She later relocated to Birmingham, England, with her family.

That year, she was jointly awarded the Nobel Peace Prize for "her struggle against the suppression of children and young people and for the right of all children to education".

Ms Yousafzai also founded the Malala Fund, an advocacy organisation for girls' education worldwide.

On Thursday, Ms Yousafzai's father, Mr Ziauddin Yousafzai, who is also a women's rights activist, took to Twitter to celebrate her acceptance to Oxford.

"My heart is full of gratitude," he wrote, thanking those who supported his daughter for "the grand cause of education".