What's News: June 27, 2016

Flood damage near Elkview, West Virginia on June 24. Days of heavy rain caused massive flooding in the state, where high waters have washed away cars, trapped hundreds and cut power to large areas.
Flood damage near Elkview, West Virginia on June 24. Days of heavy rain caused massive flooding in the state, where high waters have washed away cars, trapped hundreds and cut power to large areas. PHOTO: AFP PHOTO / WEST VIRGINIA DEPARTMENT OF TRAN

TOP OF THE NEWS

Divisions over Brexit process

European leaders cannot seem to agree on how to negotiate Britain's exit from the grouping ahead of a leaders' summit in Brussels tomorrow. European lawmakers yesterday urged Britain to begin the European Union exit proceedings at the summit, as Germany suggested the country should be given time to "reconsider" the impact of its vote.

TOP OF THE NEWS

More Car-Free Sundays

The six-month pilot of car-free Sunday mornings in the civic and central business districts will be extended and could even go into the heartland, said National Development Minister Lawrence Wong yesterday.


People getting to safety with help from the coast guard in West Virginia. PHOTO: EUROPEAN PRESSPHOTO AGENCY

WORLD

Brutal weather in US

The weather has been brutal on opposite ends of the continental US. West Virginia is experiencing its worst flooding in more than a century, prompting US President Barack Obama to declare a federal emergency. On the other side of the country, a massive wildfire is burning out of control in the foothills of central California.

WORLD

A cautionary tale for Clinton

Britain's vote against the European Union is the sort of populist victory over establishment politics that Mrs Hillary Clinton fears in the coming US presidential election. Like British leader David Cameron, the Democrat is an internationalist battling nationalist anger.

OPINION

And now, EU 'divorce' talks

With British voters opting to leave the European Union, the focus next is on timing of the "divorce" talks, and the terms. Meanwhile, the EU should address the issues that have made it so unpopular that member states want to leave it, says Europe correspondent Jonathan Eyal.

HOME

Operators wanted for gallery

The Marina Bay visitors' gallery, which closed last year after the Marina Bay exhibition ended, will be put up for community use. The Urban Redevelopment Authority has asked commercial operators for tenancy proposals.

HOME

Getting Chinese to spend

More businesses in Singapore are hoping to attract China customers by allowing them to pay for goods and services using their mobile phones. While mobile payment has not caught on in Singapore, the rate of mobile payment penetration in China was 25 per cent of the population last year.

BUSINESS

Brexit hits some S'pore stocks

Shares of Singapore firms with earnings and asset exposure to Britain took a hammering last Friday, in the aftermath of the shock Brexit . And there is lingering fear that the sell-off will continue until there is greater clarity on how the British government intends to negotiate a formal exit from the European Union, say analysts.

SPORT

England must win, or exit

For all the stylish, adventurous play that the young England men have brought to their game, their tournament, and the Roy Hodgson era, will end today if they fall to minnows Iceland in the Euro 2016 round of 16. They have had loads of goal attempts but few have gone close, let alone hit the target.

LIFE

Asians in Hollywood

Actor Chin Han, who has a role in Independence Day: Resurgence, says there has been a growing awareness of the need to improve Asian representation on screen in the nine years since he first moved to the United States. Yet, the Singaporean performer says he still sees scripts with Asian characters speaking in pidgin English.


Game Of Thrones received support from the European Regional Development Fund in its early years but not in the past few seasons, says HBO. PHOTO: HBO

LIFE

Brexit 'won't hurt Game Of Thrones'

Game Of Thrones, the hit HBO series that is partly filmed in Northern Ireland, will not suffer as a result of Britain's decision to leave the European Union (EU), the cable television network said last Friday, aiming to quash speculation that the lavishly produced show would lose EU funding.

A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on June 27, 2016, with the headline 'What's News'. Print Edition | Subscribe