Theresa May wasn't sobbing over election result: Brexit Secretary David Davis

In a still image taken from footage broadcast by the UK Parliamentary Recording Unit (PRU) on Feb 8, 2017, British Prime Minister Theresa May and British Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union (Brexit Minister) David Davis shout 'aye' in t
In a still image taken from footage broadcast by the UK Parliamentary Recording Unit (PRU) on Feb 8, 2017, British Prime Minister Theresa May and British Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union (Brexit Minister) David Davis shout 'aye' in the House of Commons in favour of a third reading of the EU Notification of Withdrawl Bill during the formal process of debating and voting on the Bill in the House of Commons in central London.PHOTO: AFP

LONDON (REUTERS) - British Prime Minister Theresa May was not sobbing over last week's failed election gamble when Brexit Secretary David Davis met her after the vote, Davis told ITV's Good Morning Britain show on Monday (June 12).

"She is fine, she is getting on with the job," Davis said when asked how May was.

When asked if she was in floods of tears on Friday, Davis said: "Not when I saw her. She is a formidably good prime minister."

Ahead of Brexit talks, Davis said the people had demanded in last year's European Union referendum to take control of the United Kingdom's borders which means leaving the single market.

Davis also said claims made by former finance minister George Osborne that May was a “dead woman walking” were wrong and self-indulgent.

“I find it incredibly self-indulgent for the Tory party to be going for this sort of stuff,” he said on ITV television, using an alternative name for the Conservative Party. “It is our job to get on with running the country.”

May’s Conservatives failed to win a parliamentary majority in an election last Thursday (June 8), meaning it will need the support of Northern Ireland’s Democratic Unionist Party to govern.  

Davis said, however, the Conservatives would not adopt the views of its intended partner on matters such as abortion and gay marriage.

"We don’t adopt their views, we don’t adopt their policies,” he said. “We’ve just been returned to government with a minority government in effect, it’s our duty to make it work, it’s our duty to make it deliver for the British people.”