Management firm removed over fatal London fire

DIGNIFIED MEETING: It was a very good meeting last night, it was very dignified, a very respectful meeting, and obviously people did have concerns that they were raising. I was able to tell them that the KCTMO will no longer have responsibility for t
DIGNIFIED MEETING: It was a very good meeting last night, it was very dignified, a very respectful meeting, and obviously people did have concerns that they were raising. I was able to tell them that the KCTMO will no longer have responsibility for the Lancaster West housing estate. - BRITISH PRIME MINISTER THERESA MAY, on a meeting on Tuesday with Grenfell survivors.

LONDON • The company in charge of managing Grenfell Tower, a housing block in a poor west London neighbourhood that saw at least 80 people killed in one of Britain's worst fires, has been removed.

After a meeting on Tuesday with Grenfell survivors, British Prime Minister Theresa May said the Kensington and Chelsea Tenant Management Organisation (KCTMO) would no longer manage the Lancaster estate where the building was located, The Telegraph reported on Wednesday.

"It was a very good meeting last night, it was very dignified, a very respectful meeting, and obviously people did have concerns that they were raising," Mrs May was quoted as saying.

"I was able to tell them that the KCTMO will no longer have responsibility for the Lancaster West housing estate."

The Telegraph report added that the company - which was established to manage almost 10,000 properties in the borough - will continue to manage other properties for the council.

Meanwhile, Kensington and Chelsea Council leaders said nine permanent accommodation offers have been accepted by survivors.

One household had moved into a new home, but more than 180 remain in hotels and temporary accommodation, the BBC reported.

Mrs May was initially criticised for failing to meet survivors of the blaze when she visited the scene earlier after the tragedy.

The inquiry into the blaze will hold its first hearing next month. The initial report is expected by Easter, according to The Telegraph.

In the early-morning hours of June 14, the 24-storey Grenfell was engulfed in a deadly blaze that was triggered by a fault in a fridge.

The fire took on a life on its own as combustible cladding on the building's exterior was thought to have fuelled the rapid spread of the blaze, trapping many residents inside their flats.

A tower block in Bristol has raised local concerns when it was found to be covered in similar cladding as Grenfell.

Eclipse Tower's owner, Bristol Alliance, said the building was considered "low risk" following safety checks, while advising residents against having barbecues on balconies, the BBC reported.

A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on August 25, 2017, with the headline 'Management firm removed over fatal London fire'. Print Edition | Subscribe