Kerry postpones Paris trip to stay at Vienna nuclear talks

French Foreign Minister Laurent Fabius (third left), EU envoy Catherine Ashton (sixth left), US Secretary of State John Kerry (third right) and Britain's Foreign Secretary Philip Hammond (front left) sit at a table during talks in Vienna Nov 21, 2014
French Foreign Minister Laurent Fabius (third left), EU envoy Catherine Ashton (sixth left), US Secretary of State John Kerry (third right) and Britain's Foreign Secretary Philip Hammond (front left) sit at a table during talks in Vienna Nov 21, 2014. US Secretary of State John Kerry on Friday postponed his trip to Paris to continue talks with his Iranian counterpart at international nuclear negotiations in Vienna, spokeswoman Jen Psaki said. -- PHOTO: REUTERS

VIENNA (AFP) - US Secretary of State John Kerry on Friday postponed his trip to Paris to continue talks with his Iranian counterpart at international nuclear negotiations in Vienna, spokeswoman Jen Psaki said.

Kerry "has delayed his departure from Vienna, Austria in order to continue consultations" with Iran's Foreign Minister Mohammed Javad Zarif, Psaki said in a statement to reporters, adding he would stay here overnight.

Psaki had said on Friday afternoon that Kerry would return later on Friday to Paris, where he had been on Thursday, for consultations with his European counterparts about the nuclear talks.

But the US top diplomat then went into a third round of talks with Zarif since arriving in the Austrian capital late Thursday before Psaki announced his departure to Paris had been postponed.

Zarif said, meanwhile, that world powers made no "significant" new proposals in the talks here aimed at defusing a 12-year standoff over Iran's suspect nuclear programme, ahead of a Monday deadline.

Iran and the six powers - the US, china, Russia, Britain, France and Germany - have been negotiating intensively since February to turn an interim accord with Iran, reached a year ago, into a lasting agreement before Nov 24.

Such a deal is aimed at easing fears that Teheran will develop nuclear weapons under the guise of its civilian activities - an ambition the Islamic republic has denied.