British family's double-storey, six-bedroom house built in three days

The Cooper family stands in front of their "flat-pack mansion", which was erected in three days.
The Cooper family stands in front of their "flat-pack mansion", which was erected in three days.PHOTO: CHANNEL 4
The flat-packed pre-fabricated double-storey house cost £1.2 million (S$2 million).
The flat-packed pre-fabricated double-storey house cost £1.2 million (S$2 million). PHOTO: DAILYMAIL
The Cooper family had a double-storey, six-bedroom mansion delivered from Germany to Dorset, Britain.
The Cooper family had a double-storey, six-bedroom mansion delivered from Germany to Dorset, Britain.PHOTO: DAILYMAIL

Imagine putting together a house the way you would a shelf from Ikea. That's exactly what the Cooper family in Dorset, England did.

The result: a double-storey, six-bedroom mansion delivered from Germany and put together in just three days.

The flat-packed pre-fabricated double-storey house cost £1.2 million (S$2 million), the Daily Mail said.

Richard and Nikki Cooper and their new home were featured on Britain's Channel 4, on the series Flat Pack Mansions.

The couple, who have two children, used to work in the music industry and now own a chain of pizza restaurants.

They bought a plot of land in Dorset, and wanted a more modern home.

They didn't want an " old-fashioned Victorian or Georgian house", Mrs Cooper said in the show.

All the walls and fittings, including doors and windows, were pre-fabricated in a factory in Bavaria.

The couple felt that it would be environmentally friendly, and they would have more control over the budget and time it would be built in.

After they designed and ordered it, the house was created and delivered to Dorset in five days.

Then it took just three days to erect the structure. They put in the first two storeys in two days, then put the roof in on day three.

The bespoke home exceeded their budget by £500,000, Mr Cooper said. While not the cheapest way to build a house, it was "interesting", he said.

Flat pack homes are becoming more popular, and a timber-frame, flat packed house can cost 10 to 25 per cent less to build than a conventional home, the Daily Mail said.