Britain's Prince Charles visits quake-hit Italian town, describes it as 'terrifying devastation'

Prince Charles walking through the town of Amatrice, which was levelled after an earthquake last year.
Prince Charles walking through the town of Amatrice, which was levelled after an earthquake last year. PHOTO: REUTERS
Prince Charles pays his respects to the victims of the earthquake in the town of Amatrice.
Prince Charles pays his respects to the victims of the earthquake in the town of Amatrice. PHOTO: REUTERS

AMATRICE (AFP) - Britain's Prince Charles hugged tearful survivors in the quake-hit Italian town of Amatrice on Sunday (April 2) after seeing the "terrifying devastation" inflicted by last year's deadly disaster.

The Prince of Wales walked alone in silent contemplation through parts of the abandoned "red zone" where collapsed houses lie next to the ruins of a 13th century Civic Tower in the historic hilltop town in central Italy.

"It's a scene of terrifying devastation," he said as he passed in front of the destroyed Church of Sant'Agostino, where the only signs of life were stray cats that roamed the gardens of buildings flattened by the August 2016 quake.

Wearing a yellow protection helmet and a grey pinstriped suit, he met the town's mayor Sergio Pirozzi, who told him he had not been back into the red zone since the quake "and will not until the town is rebuilt. We have to look to the future".

"I wish I could do more for you, your resilience is amazing," the 68-year-old prince told one local man after shaking the hands of first responders and those helping with the reconstruction after the disaster that killed nearly 300 people, including three Brits who were there on holiday.

The Prince, who arrived by helicopter due to quake-damaged roads, placed a garland of yellow and white flowers on a memorial in the park where survivors had slept in the days immediately following the quake. At the time, many of the survivors were still waiting for news of their trapped loved ones.

"I told him I lost my husband that night, he was very moved, he embraced me," Ms Marina Torredi, 65, told AFP.

A HERO

"It was a hugely emotional moment. I introduced him to Agostino, a rescuer who pulled me from the rubble that night - he said he was a hero," she said.

Survivor Carmine Monteforte, 75, who had been waiting for a glimpse of the Prince along with a group of locals waving Union Jack flags, said he also got a big hug from Prince Charles. "It was a lovely gesture of human warmth, I teared up. His visit has certainly raised morale here," he said.

The Amatrice visit was part of a European tour by the Prince of Wales and his wife Camilla designed to shore up relations with European Union allies post-Brexit. The charm offensive, which started in Romania and ends in Austria on Wednesday, comes just as Britain this week officially triggered the Brexit process.

Charles's son Prince William and his wife Kate undertook a similar trip to Paris earlier this month.

RENAISSANCE MAN

The six-day Italian tour began on Friday with a stroll over Florence's mediaeval Ponte Vecchio bridge at sundown.

While Prince Charles was in Amatrice, Camilla was visiting the Arcobaleno association in Florence which helps female victims of human trafficking - a hot issue in Italy during a time when the country is rescuing hundreds of thousands of migrants in the Mediterranean, including women.

The royals will be back in the Tuscan capital on Monday to attend a reception hosted by the Palazzo Strozzi Foundation to mark the 100th anniversary of the British Institute of Florence, where Charles will be honoured as the "Renaissance Man of the Year". The heir to the throne and the Duchess of Cornwall will meet Pope Francis and tour the Vatican the following day.

The stop in the beauty spot of Amatrice was not the prince's first to a quake-hit zone. In 2004, Charles travelled to the scene of an earthquake that devastated the ancient Iranian city of Bam, killing over 40,000 people. In 2006, he and Camilla visited Kashmir, where a quake left over 73,000 people dead and displaced 3.5 million.

After the Amatrice disaster, Queen Elizabeth made a personal donation to help re-house the homeless and restore the dozens of architectural gems in the region damaged by the 2016 quake.