Britain's next PM to be appointed by Sept 2, Brexit negotiation should come before election: Conservatives

British Prime Minister David Cameron speaks to the press in front of 10 Downing Street in central London on June 24, 2016.
British Prime Minister David Cameron speaks to the press in front of 10 Downing Street in central London on June 24, 2016.PHOTO: AFP

LONDON (Reuters) - Britain's next prime minister will be appointed by Sept 2 at the latest under a timetable put forward on Monday (June 27) by the committee responsible for running the leadership contest triggered by David Cameron's decision to resign.

"We recommend that the process of electing a new leader of the Conservative Party should commence next week... and conclude no later than Friday the second of September," said Mr Graham Brady, chair of the 1922 committee of Conservative lawmakers.

He told reporters that an earlier conclusion might be possible and that nominations must be submitted by 11am GMT on Thursday. The proposals are subject to approval by the full committee.

Asked if there should be an early parliamentary election following the selection of that new leader, Mr Brady said the negotiation with the EU should be carried out first.

"We have just been given a very clear steer, direction by the people of Britain ... we have a big complicated task to accomplish," he said. "I think it is entirely reasonable to expect that the government should embark on that, get on with that, seek to negotiate as good an outcome as we can before the people then are asked to approve or reject that in a general election."

Mr Cameron said he would resign after Britons voted to leave the EU last week.