Briefs: German paper offers to concede 1966 goal

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan (centre) greets supporters as he arrives for the inauguration of the Bayzid I Mosque (Yildrim Bayezid) at the Esenboga International Airport in Ankara, on June 23, 2016.
Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan (centre) greets supporters as he arrives for the inauguration of the Bayzid I Mosque (Yildrim Bayezid) at the Esenboga International Airport in Ankara, on June 23, 2016.PHOTO: AFP

German paper offers to concede 1966 goal

BERLIN • Germany's top-selling newspaper, Bild, made a last-ditch plea for Britons to stay in the EU, promising to finally concede England's long-disputed 1966 Wembley World Cup goal if they vote "Remain".

Bild also said it would "no longer make any jokes about Prince Charles' ears" - if Britain keeps its faith with the European Union.

"Dear Britons, if you stay in the EU, we will recognise the Wembley goal ourselves!" read the daily's front-page headline.

The goal was one of the most controversial in World Cup history.

AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE


Brexit 'may change anti-terror fight'

THE HAGUE • Europe may have to set up new ways of sharing vital intelligence to protect itself in the fight against terror groups if Britain leaves the EU, the top Dutch anti-terror chief warned.

Intelligence cooperation with Britain, which has a large number of foreign fighters who have joined the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria (ISIS) group, is "excellent", national counter-terrorism coordinator Dick Schoof told foreign reporters.

But in the event of Britain leaving the European Union, "we would have to find new arrangements". The 28 members of the European Union already share tip-offs and information, particularly through the European police agency, known as Europol.

But if Britain votes to leave the bloc, it would cease at some point to be a member of Europol.

AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE


Turkish leader suggests EU referendum too

ANKARA • Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan has suggested that Turkey could hold a referendum over whether to continue its long-stalled accession process to join the European Union.

Lashing out at the bloc's treatment of Ankara, Mr Erdogan said Turkey could hold a referendum along the lines of the plebiscite in Britain.

His comments were the first time that he had raised the prospect of holding a referendum on Turkey's EU bid. Mr Erdogan had previously insisted that full membership of the European Union was Turkey's strategic aim.

"We can stand up and ask the people just like the British are doing," Mr Erdogan said late on Wednesday during a speech in Istanbul, quoted by the state-run Anadolu news agency.

AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE

A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on June 24, 2016, with the headline 'Briefs'. Print Edition | Subscribe