Invisible Lives: A legacy of China's family planning rules

Strict family planning measures were introduced in China in the late 70s and early 80s to slow population growth, including a one-child policy. This film tells three personal stories of people who struggled with the restrictive rules.

CHINA (REUTERS) - Strict family planning measures were introduced in China in the late 70s and early 80s to slow population growth, including a one-child policy. 

The latest national census in 2010 indicated 13 million unregistered people in China, mostly children born in contravention of the family planning rules. 

In 2016, the family planning rules were relaxed and the one-child policy dropped. However, it is still unclear what this means for children who were born before the changes. 

This film tells the stories of Yang Zhizhu, who has a second child and campaigns against the family planning rules; Li Xue, who has spent her entire life unregistered because she is a second child; and Liu Chunyan, who is a single mother with a daughter born outside marriage. 

It is an intimate portrait of three people who have struggled with the restrictive rules.