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Multimedia: Vision, Interrupted

One look at Christina Au will tell you she is like everyone else.

But the 22-year-old suffers from optic neuropathy - a disorder of nerves and visual pathways - resulting in blurred vision that is similar to myopia. Unfortunately, her condition is genetic and cannot be fixed by corrective lenses.

According to the Singapore Association of the Visually Handicapped, she is part of a growing number of people suffering from "low vision" or "partial sight." The number of newly-registered clients at the association has been steadily increasing for the past six years, reaching 158 in 2011/2012. 

To cope with her blurred vision (similiar to 600-1000 degrees of myopia), Christina relies on memory, an eye piece with 20x magnification, and a smart phone armed with nearly a dozen transportation apps to help her get around independently.

Christina's journey is a timely anecdote for this year's World Sight Day, which is honoured on the second Thursday of every October. She recounts to Through the Lens the difficulties she faced when her vision was abruptly interrupted, and why she still looks forward to the future. 

Shot and produced by: Ashleigh Sim and Ted Chen

Released on: Oct 11, 2012

Copyright The Straits Times 2012

Christina Au lost partial vision at age 10. She is part of a growing number of people suffering from "low vision" or "partial sight." TTL recounts her story.

- Ted Chen

One look at Christina Au will tell you she is like everyone else.

But the 22-year-old suffers from optic neuropathy - a disorder of nerves and visual pathways - resulting in blurred vision that is similar to myopia. Unfortunately, her condition is genetic and cannot be fixed by corrective lenses.

According to the Singapore Association of the Visually Handicapped, she is part of a growing number of people suffering from "low vision" or "partial sight." The number of newly-registered clients at the association has been steadily increasing for the past six years, reaching 158 in 2011/2012. 

To cope with her blurred vision (similiar to 600-1000 degrees of myopia), Christina relies on memory, an eye piece with 20x magnification, and a smart phone armed with nearly a dozen transportation apps to help her get around independently.

Christina's journey is a timely anecdote for this year's World Sight Day, which is honoured on the second Thursday of every October. She recounts to Through the Lens the difficulties she faced when her vision was abruptly interrupted, and why she still looks forward to the future. 

Shot and produced by: Ashleigh Sim and Ted Chen

Released on: Oct 11, 2012

Copyright The Straits Times 2012

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