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Sex-for-grades trial resumes after short recess to address law prof's request for documents

Published on Jan 11, 2013 11:07 AM
 
Day two of the sex-for-grades corruption trial, involving law professor Tey Tsun Hang (above), barely got underway on Friday morning when it was adjourned. -- ST PHOTO : WONG KWAI CHOW

Day two of the sex-for-grades corruption trial, involving law professor Tey Tsun Hang, barely got underway on Friday morning when it was adjourned.

Tey, who is facing six charges of corruptly obtaining gifts and sex from a female student in exchange for better grades, requested if he could have access to documents he had previously sought for last year.

These include documents containing the academic grades of former National University of Singapore (NUS) students, including that of the prosecution's star witness Darinne Ko, who are involved in the ongoing trial.

Tey had applied for the same documents last year in court proceedings leading up to the trial but was told it was premature then for him to do so.

The nine-day hearing, which started Thursday, was stood down just 30 minutes after it started this morning, for the matter to be addressed.

It resumed at about 11am.

Ms Ko, who is the woman at the centre of the sex-for-grades case, arrived at the Subordinate Courts at 8.30am Friday.

She was set to return to the witness stand to give evidence for a second day before Tey made his request to Chief District Judge Tan Siong Thye, the trial judge.

On the first day of the trial, Ms Ko painted a picture of love which flourished for a time between her and Tey, who was once her professor at NUS.

She had, between May and July 2010, bought him gifts and they had sex twice - gratification, which are now the subject of the alleged charges brought against Tey last year.

The gifts included a $740 Montblanc pen, two tailored shirts worth $236.20, a $160 iPod touch, and a $1,278.60 payment for a dinner Tey hosted. The sex took place in his office at NUS on July24 and 28, 2010.

Presenting its case yesterday, the prosecution made clear that "the cloak of love provides no cover for what was essentially an NUS law professor taking advantage of his student".

Tey, who is conducting his own defence, may have the chance to cross-examine Ms Ko later today.

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