Gaming

Secretlab raises the game with new lines of chairs

The two newly launched lines of Secretlab gaming chairs are a dream come true for anyone who spends the majority of his day firmly planted in a seat, whether he is a gamer or not.

The Throne V2 and the Omega are sequels to the highly popular Throne V1, which has sold more than 1,000 units since its launch in March.

The V2 maintains the V1's arresting racing stripe aesthetic with an injection of new upgrades, while the Omega is a more refined-looking product which is intended for office use.

Both chairs offer many improvements over their predecessors, including a sturdier aluminium wheelbase instead of a plastic one, armrests that can be adjusted on four axes, and softer velour support pillows.

Before testing out the chairs, I, like many office workers, did not give much consideration to what I was sitting on. I was using a regular wheeled chair that I packed with various cushions to brace myself against, and I would often find myself hunched over because of the lack of support.

The Throne V2 (left) and the Omega are sequels to the highly popular Throne V1. They feature an aluminium wheelbase and armrests that can be adjusted on four axes.
The Throne V2 (above) and the Omega are sequels to the highly popular Throne V1. They feature an aluminium wheelbase and armrests that can be adjusted on four axes. PHOTO: SECRETLAB

But after trying out the Secretlab chairs, I began to understand what a big difference a proper sitting posture makes.

I found myself feeling less physical tension at work, and I also stopped fidgeting as much.

I tried out both the Throne V2 and the Omega, but although the Omega is billed as the more premium of the pair, I prefer the V2.

  • TECH SPECS

    PRICE: Throne V2, $429; Omega, $499

    RECOMMENDED HEIGHT: 160cm to 180cm

    RECOMMENDED WEIGHT: 100kg for the V2 and 110kg for the Omega

  • RATING

    FEATURES: 5/5

    DESIGN: 5/5

    PERFORMANCE: 4/5

    VALUE FOR MONEY: 5/5

    OVERALL: 5/5

Although it does not have features like the Omega's tilt mechanism, which allows you to change the angle of the seat of the chair, I felt that the thinner padding allowed me to feel the structure of the chair more clearly, and that it provided more support.

Some of my colleagues preferred the plushness of the Omega though, so choosing between the two is entirely a matter of personal preference.

Both chairs are contoured like the bucket seats of racing cars, with edges that curve gently up or inward to cocoon you.

The armrests are also adjustable - they can be moved up/down, backwards/forwards, left/right and angled inwards/outwards - which I found very useful.

For example, I configured them differently to type or watch a show, and I lowered them so that I could roll the chair under my table at the end of the day.

I do wish that the head pillow could be moved slightly lower as I found - perhaps because I am not tall - that it was a tad too high for me.

The metal wheelbase of the chair, while solid, does feel a little harsh around the edges if you rest your bare feet on it.

But these are minor quibbles over an otherwise great product.

A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on November 11, 2015, with the headline 'Secretlab raises the game with new lines of chairs'. Print Edition | Subscribe