Pokemon Go away: 6 instances when overzealous players wreaked havoc

A man poses with his mobile phone displaying the augmented reality mobile game Pokemon Go in front of a busy crossing in Shibuya district in Tokyo. PHOTO: REUTERS
A man poses with his mobile phone displaying the augmented reality mobile game Pokemon Go in front of a busy crossing in Shibuya district in Tokyo. PHOTO: REUTERS

Since its release on July 6, augmented reality mobile game Pokemon Go has caused Pokemon fanatics all over the world to trawl every nook and cranny for these critters.

However, in the midst of their catching frenzy, aspiring Pokemon trainers have left a trail of undesirable happenings in their wake.

Here are six instances where Pokemon Go players have gone overboard in their gaming zeal.

1. ARIZONA, US: TODDLER, WHATEVER



Arizona couple Brent and Brianne Daley were arrested for child endangerment and neglect, and were held in custody at Pinal County Sheriff's Office jail. PHOTO: EPA

Couple Brent, 27, and Brianne Daley, 25, left their two-year-old son unattended outside their residence in 30 deg C heat for 90 minutes before police found the child.

The boy, who was found without water, was screaming and trying to get back into the house.

When police phoned the father to inform him of his son, he allegedly replied "Whatever" and hung up.

The couple returned home almost an hour later, insisting that they had been out to refuel their car.

However, they later admitted to police that they had been on Pokemon Go and were "stopping at parks and other places to interact with the game".

2.SAN DIEGO, US: FALLING OFF A CLIFF

Approximately 800km west of Arizona in San Diego, two men aged 21 and 22 years old were discovered after San Diego Lifeguards reported that someone had fallen off a cliff.

One was found about 25m down the cliff on the beach, while the other was about 15m down the cliff.

Both men were taken to Scripps La Jolla Hospital.

While the extent of their injuries was unknown, it is believed that one of the men may have consumed alcohol.

3. VICTORIA, AUSTRALIA : CRASHING INTO SCHOOL

A 19-year-old is likely to be charged with careless driving after losing control of his vehicle while trying to capture a creature on Pokemon Go.

He crashed into a Melbourne school while negotiating a roundabout, smashing through a fence and into a school portable building. No one was injured.

This was despite government agency VicRoads introducing almost 40 flashing road signs warning drivers "Don't drive and Pokemon" a few days before.

Police also warned that chasing Pokemon while driving could earn a fine and four demerit points.

4. BALTIMORE, US: CRASHING INTO COP CAR

In another traffic incident linked to Pokemon Go, the Baltimore Police Department posted a video of a man crashing his car into a parked police vehicle while playing Pokemon Go.

Shockingly, the man is seen getting straight out of the car with the game still running in his hand.

5. RIO, BRAZIL: OLYMPIC SIZE PHONE BILL



Olympic gymnast Kohei Uchimura chalked up a $6,595 phone bill in Rio playing Pokemon Go. PHOTO: REUTERS

Japan's six-time world champion gymnast Kohei Uchimura is a multiple record-breaker in gymnasiums, but has fared considerably poorer in the battle gyms of Pokemon Go.

The reigning gold medallist in the men's all-round competition accumulated a 500,000 yen (S$6,595) phone bill because of the mobile data he used playing the game.

Fortunately, Uchimura's Japanese service provider committed to reduce his bill to a 3,000 yen (S$39.60) daily charge that allows him as much data as he wants to play the game.

6. SYDNEY, AUSTRALIA: TROUBLESOME POKESTOP


Pokemon Go players in Sydney. PHOTO: AFP

Hundreds of players once thronged a park in inner Sydney as it was one of Australia's best places to catch Pokemon.

However, traffic jams, piles of rubbish and noise into the wee hours resulted in disgruntled residents complaining, and some took matters into their own hands by allegedly water bombing the players.

This resulted in the creators of the game working to remove certain real-world locations from the mobile game.

Sources: Sky News, NBC, The Guardian, Kotaku, Independent, BBC