Golf: HSBC Women's Champions golfers ham it up in traditional warrior outfits

Paula Creamer (left), Inbee Park (centre left), Suzann Pettersen (centre right), and Shanshan Feng (right), at the opening press conference for the HSBC Women's Champions golf tournament. Used to battling each other on greens and fairways, four
Paula Creamer (left), Inbee Park (centre left), Suzann Pettersen (centre right), and Shanshan Feng (right), at the opening press conference for the HSBC Women's Champions golf tournament. Used to battling each other on greens and fairways, four of the world's top female golfers took it to another level by donning warrior outfits to promote the HSBC Women's Champions tournament in Singapore on Feb 25, 2014. -- ST PHOTO: NG SOR LUAN

Used to battling each other on greens and fairways, four of the world's top female golfers took it to another level by donning warrior outfits to promote the HSBC Women's Champions tournament in Singapore on Tuesday.

Instead of their typical sponsor-rich polo tees and shorts, world No. 1 Park In Bee, Suzann Pettersen (No. 2), Feng Shanshan (No. 6) and Paula Creamer (No. 11) amused and bemused a press conference in distinct Asian attire.

Besides posing for countless shots in front of the media scrum, the quartet - donning sneakers to go with their male costumes (though no one protested) - displayed short bursts of the respective martial arts which they learnt backstage.

A nervous Park looked out of sorts in a silat melayu costume. But she sportingly - and somewhat threateningly - waved her hands around, perhaps warning rivals off her top ranking.

"We all know how tough this tournament is so it makes a lot of sense for us to adopt these warrior personalities as we get ready to go into battle," said the South Korean.

Creamer could barely wipe a cherubic smile off her face. The American dazzled in a kung fu attire that was brightened by her diamond engagement ring.

"I've always wanted to be on Dancing with the Stars - this could be a warm-up," the charming 27-year-old gushed.

Representing the weapon-based Indian martial art of thang ta, Pettersen held a lofty driver instead of a sword. The stern-looking Norwegian whipped it about frantically, drawing the loudest cheers.

It was left to China's Feng, representing the Indonesian art of pencak silat, to sum up the whole experience, which involved nearly two hours of make-up and preparation.

She said: "It was for good fun. I learnt that golf attire suits me best."

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