Formula 1: Five things to look out for at the 2014 Singapore Airlines Singapore GP

Marina Bay Street Circuit for the 2014 Formula One Singapore Airlines Singapore Grand Prix as seen at dusk and in rainy conditions from Swissotel The Stamford on Sept 11, 2014. -- ST PHOTO: KEVIN LIM
Marina Bay Street Circuit for the 2014 Formula One Singapore Airlines Singapore Grand Prix as seen at dusk and in rainy conditions from Swissotel The Stamford on Sept 11, 2014. -- ST PHOTO: KEVIN LIM

SINGAPORE'S Formula One night race may be entering its seventh year, but there are still novelties and surprises in store for fans at the dazzling Marina Bay Street Circuit. From warring team-mates to new engines, here's five things to take note of - whether you are at the circuit park or watching in your living room.

1. Pole is Gold

Being a tight street circuit with limited overtaking opportunities, grabbing pole position in Singapore is akin to putting one foot in the winners' circle.

Four of the six editions have been won by the fastest qualifier, although the appearance of the dreaded safety car could breathe new life into the "street procession".

2. Mercedes Frenemies

From punctured tyres and pride to questioning the other's nationality, team-mates Lewis Hamilton and Nico Rosberg have turned their battle for the world title into a personal war of words and aggressive driving.

With six races remaining and just 22 points separating the one-time friends, Hamilton could shoot to the top if he wins on Sunday and Rosberg finishes outside the top eight.

3. Don't Count Out Fernando

With just two podium finishes this season, the two-time world champion is seeing red at troubled Ferrari.

But, buoyed by his Singapore triumphs in 2008 and 2010, the wily Spaniard should never be discounted as a dark horse, especially if he qualifies near the front of the grid.

4. Less Noise, More Poise

The switch to quieter, more efficient 1.6-litre V6 engines this season has been derided by purists and earplug sellers alike.

With a new setup, it will be intriguing to see if drivers change their approach to the 5.073-km Marina Bay circuit, where tight corners and tricky chicanes perennially reign supreme.

5. No Talking, Please

Singapore will be the first race where the controversial ban on teams sending coded messages to their drivers via radio or pit boards comes into effect.

Drivers are also not allowed to ask direct technical questions to their team, such as whether they are using the right torque map, prompting concerns over safety.

Kimi Raikkonen's stinging rebukes could be a thing of the past as fans will also hear less chatter between drivers and their engineers.