Football: Bookies turn against England manager Sam Allardyce as FA discusses sting

England manager Sam Allardyce is likely to lose his job following a newspaper sting that showed him criticising the FA and seeking a lucrative role as an adviser in the Far East.
England manager Sam Allardyce is likely to lose his job following a newspaper sting that showed him criticising the FA and seeking a lucrative role as an adviser in the Far East.PHOTO: REUTERS

LONDON (Reuters) - England manager Sam Allardyce is odds-on with bookmakers to lose his job following a newspaper sting that showed him ranting about a "corrupt" tax system, criticising the FA and seeking a lucrative role as an adviser in the Far East.

Allardyce, who was appointed in July following the departure of Roy Hodgson after this year's European Championship, has overseen one match - a 1-0 World Cup qualifying victory over Slovakia.

One of the highest-paid managers in the game with a salary of around £3 million (S$5.29 million) a year, Allardyce was secretly filmed by the Daily Telegraph discussing England's failings with a group he had been told were businessmen with interests in Singapore and Hong Kong.

The 61-year-old discussed a deal where he would be paid £400,000 for a series of visits and speeches, though he made it clear that any arrangement would have to be cleared with his employers - the FA.

Local media reported that FA chairman Greg Clarke and chief executive Martin Glenn were discussing the issue after summoning Allardyce to Wembley.

The Telegraph on Tuesday released a second extract from the video showing a rambling Allardyce condemning the UK's tax operation - HMRC - as "the most corrupt business in Britain".

The original film, released late on Monday, showed Allardyce criticising Hodgson and England's players after their Euro 2016 exit at the hands of Iceland, as well as mimicking Hodgson's speech impediment by referring to him as "Woy".

The most contentious issue, however, is likely to be his comments about third party ownership of players.

"You can still get around it," he said in reference to the ban on such arrangements introduced by the FA in 2008 and made worldwide by Fifa last year.

Bookmaker William Hill cut the odds on Allardyce being sacked to 1-3 following a number of bets on Tuesday.