Football: Investigator Pieth challenges Fifa president Blatter to reveal salary

PORT LOUIS (REUTERS) - Mark Pieth, an independent Swiss lawyer managing Fifa's reform process, challenged president Sepp Blatter and his senior executives to reveal their salaries on Friday.

Pieth, chairman of the Independent Governance Committee (IGC), made the demand in his address in front of 208 delegates at Fifa's annual Congress while Blatter looked on.

The reform process, which began two years ago, is intended to bring far greater transparency to world soccer's governing body.

Pieth pulled no punches when he said that part of that transparency included disclosing the remuneration of Blatter and his executive committee.

Blatter said earlier that the period of reform was ending at this Congress, but Pieth disagreed.

"A key remaining issue in transparency is the remuneration of key officials. These did not come overnight for other organisations either but Fifa needs to catch up," he said.

"I would like to invite the president and members of the executive committee to take this step as it would send a crucial message to their constituencies and to the wider public that they have nothing to hide.

"It is unfortunate that this Congress may not be able to take a decision on age and term limits either. These may not be the most fundamental of reform issues but they send a symbolic message."

Blatter did not directly respond to Pieth's demand to allow his salary to be revealed but said that the discussion on age limit and mandate limits would be discussed further by the executive committee and would be on the agenda at next year's Congress in Sao Paolo in Brazil.

The presidents of both Denmark and Germany, Allan Hansen and Wolfgang Niersbach, both criticised the decision not to discuss the age and mandate issues.

Niersbach told delegates he regretted Fifa's decision saying: "For the public at large this would have been a very important signal, even better as it would have at least brought this reform process to an end. It is not just for the executive committee in Zurich, it affects all of us."