Football: FA chairman Dyke envisages video replays

Football Association chairman Greg Dyke has expressed hope that the introduction of goal-line technology will soon be followed by the provision of video replays for referees. -- FILE PHOTO: AP
Football Association chairman Greg Dyke has expressed hope that the introduction of goal-line technology will soon be followed by the provision of video replays for referees. -- FILE PHOTO: AP

LONDON, England (AFP) - Football Association chairman Greg Dyke has expressed hope that the introduction of goal-line technology will soon be followed by the provision of video replays for referees.

Goal-line technology will be used for the first time in an official match in England during Sunday's Community Shield between Manchester United and Wigan Athletic at Wembley.

The Hawk-Eye technology, which is also ready for use at all 20 Premier League grounds, uses 14 high-speed cameras to monitor the two goals and sends a signal to match officials within a second of a goal being scored.

The system has been introduced to prevent mistakes occurring when referees fail to spot that the ball has crossed the goal-line, and Dyke thinks it will not be long before other technological aids are introduced.

"With the coming of goal-line technology, I just believe that when we look back in 25 years' time, we'll say, 'That was only the beginning,'" he told reporters in London.

"I think it's inevitable that there will be more use of video technology to help referees.

"The thing you're always going to play off is, how much is it going to slow up the game, how much does it spoil the game, and all the rest of it.

"But refereeing is getting harder and harder, I think. They do a great job, but it's a tough job now and over time, anything that helps the referee should be looked at."

Dyke believes video replays could be used to help officials review contentious penalty appeals, but he says it is vital that the primacy of the referee's authority is preserved.

"Personally, I think penalty kicks is a no-brainer at some stage, but only if it's the referee (who reviews the footage)," said Dyke, who succeeded David Bernstein in July.

"We need to see how this (goal-line technology) goes first, but I do think in time it's inevitable." Asked if he was concerned that referees would end up using video replays as a fail-safe for every penalty decision, Dyke said individual circumstances would have to be taken into account.

"There are some blatant penalties, and there are some not so (blatant)," he said.