Ferrari owners pay tribute to Singapore Paralympians' courage and commitment

Ferraris lining up in front of the sports centre for the Paralympians Parade.
Ferraris lining up in front of the sports centre for the Paralympians Parade.ST PHOTO: LIM YAOHUI
Ferraris leaving the National Library.
Ferraris leaving the National Library.ST PHOTO: NICOLE CHIA
Paralympian Laurentia Tan waving to the camera at National Library.
Paralympian Laurentia Tan waving to the camera at National Library.ST PHOTO: MARK CHEONG
Paralympian Theresa Goh posing for a photo in a Ferrari.
Paralympian Theresa Goh posing for a photo in a Ferrari.ST PHOTO: LIM YAOHUI
Paralympian Yip Pin Xiu posing for a photo in the Ferrari.
Paralympian Yip Pin Xiu posing for a photo in the Ferrari. ST PHOTO: LIM YAOHUI
Para-athlete Suhairi bin Suhani posing for a photograph with a Ferrari.
Para-athlete Suhairi bin Suhani posing for a photograph with a Ferrari.ST PHOTO: LIM YAOHUI

SINGAPORE - The 11 gleaming Ferraris that ferried Singapore's Paralympians during their celebratory parade on Saturday (Sept 24) could not be missed - their exteriors were sleek and glossy, and the sound of their revved-up engines reverberated throughout the streets.

But what could be missed, however, were the owners of these luxury cars, who were so insistent on steering clear of the limelight that it was only after much persuasion that they agreed to speak to the media.

Lawyer Timothy Tan had rounded up his friends from the Ferrari Owners' Singapore Club when he learnt that a celebratory parade would be held for Singapore's Paralympians.

The 54-year-old ferried chef de mission Ho Cheng Kwee throughout the parade, which started at Sengkang and ended at VivoCity, with a pit stop at the National Library along the way.

Speaking to the media at the final stop at VivoCity, Tan said: "I feel that the para-athletes are often overshadowed by their able-bodied counterparts, and they play second fiddle.

"But for them to achieve what they did, they had to put in a lot more effort because of their disabilities - they have to overcome and endure a lot more to get to where they are.

"So we wanted to give them a grand parade; something memorable in our own small way."

 

The experience of ferrying triple Paralympic champion Yip Pin Xiu was indeed a memorable one for Deutsche Bank wealth management managing director Elaine Lim-Chan.

The 45-year-old was full of praise for Yip, who brought home two gold medals from the 2016 Paralympic Games in Rio.

Said Lim-Chan: "We talked a lot. Besides going to school at Singapore Management University, she also has to train twice a day - that is commitment to me.

"Pin Xiu is so strong mentally. She's a great inspiration for many children out there that no matter who you are, you can do anything if you set your mind on it.

"I am very humbled."

Eleven of the Republic's Paralympians occupied a Ferrari each, while boccia players Toh Sze Ning and Nurulasyiqah Taha were driven in more spacious London cabs as their mobility is more restricted.