Close to 7,000 takes the roads for OCBC Cycle's community rides

Flagging off the 42km sportive ride at the OCBC Cycle on Sunday morning.
Flagging off the 42km sportive ride at the OCBC Cycle on Sunday morning.PHOTO: TIFFANY GOH FOR THE STRAITS TIMES
Sport Singapore CEO Lim Teck Yin and Minister for Culture, Community and Youth Grace Fu take part in the 23km The Straits Times ride.
Sport Singapore CEO Lim Teck Yin and Minister for Culture, Community and Youth Grace Fu take part in the 23km The Straits Times ride. PHOTO: TIFFANY GOH FOR THE STRAITS TIMES
Cyclists along Sheares Avenue.
Cyclists along Sheares Avenue. PHOTO: TIFFANY GOH FOR THE STRAITS TIMES
Cyclists along Sheares Avenue.
Cyclists along Sheares Avenue. PHOTO: TIFFANY GOH FOR THE STRAITS TIMES
Cyclists  return to the end point at the National Stadium.
Cyclists return to the end point at the National Stadium. PHOTO: TIFFANY GOH FOR THE STRAITS TIMES
Sportive girls distribute fruits to cyclists after their ride.
Sportive girls distribute fruits to cyclists after their ride. PHOTO: TIFFANY GOH FOR THE STRAITS TIMES

SINGAPORE - Almost 7,000 riders - both the seasoned and the rookies - cruised on the roads on early Sunday morning for the community rides of the OCBC Cycle, beginning on the Nicoll Highway and ending under the dome of the National Stadium.

The majority of riders took part in the Sportive Ride, completing 42km that took them past local icons such as the Singapore Flyer, Gardens by the Bay and East Coast Park, a spot familiar to many cycling enthusiasts.

About 2,100 - including Minister for Culture, Community and Youth Grace Fu and Sport Singapore chief executive officer Lim Teck Yin - rode in the Straits Times Ride, a shorter ride at 23km.

With OCBC now experienced organisers of cycling events - the bank are into their eighth year of running Singapore's largest mass cycling event - most participants had no complaints about the running of the event.

Said Mr Simon Teo, a 68-year-old retiree who has taken part in every single edition of the OCBC Cycle: "It's gotten better and improved tremendously over the years, especially the safety aspects."

 

OCBC first started running the event in 2009, with its popularity surging to accommodating close to 12,000 riders within a few years. But it has scaled down over the years in an attempt to pay closer attention to safety and managing congestion.

"I think it should stay this way," said Mr Teo. "It's better and easier for organisers to monitor."

Swati Shekhar, a 36-year-old Indian national who has been working and living in Singapore for three years, is looking to enter her young daughter, who turns four soon, in the kids' ride next year.

Said the product manager, who rides to work every day and took part in the Straits Times Ride: "It was an enjoyable ride and there wasn't any issue with the event."

The OCBC Cycle concludes with the community rides, having also held the competitive South-east Asia Speedway Championship and the kids' rides on Saturday.