Watch and listen to highlights from the National Archives' collection

The National Archives of Singapore's (NAS) repository has grown to more than 10 million records today.
The National Archives of Singapore's (NAS) repository has grown to more than 10 million records today.PHOTO: NATIONAL ARCHIVES OF SINGAPORE

Established in 1968 with just 15,000 records, the National Archives of Singapore's (NAS) repository has grown to more than 10 million records today. These include photographs, maps, building plans, posters and audio and video recordings.

These are some highlights from its database.

Listen

1. War survivor, the late Mrs Elizabeth Choy, recounts in this interview how she got involved in passing messages, food and medicine to internees in Changi Camp during the Japanese Occupation. She also described the layout of her cell and how her husband had been brought in to watch her being tortured.


War survivor, the late Mrs Elizabeth Choy. PHOTO: ST FILE 

2. Hear famous Cantonese storyteller Lee Dai Soh share more about his growing up years and how he had been deeply influenced by the drama sessions held at Yeung Ching School.


Cantonese storyteller Lee Dai Soh, also known as Lei Dai Soh and Li Dasha. PHOTO: UNKNOWN

View

1. This black-and-white film is one of the earliest audio-visual recordings and home videos in NAS' collection. It contains footage of a Peranakan bride that was captured on 16mm film.


Footage of a Peranakan bride that was captured on 16mm film. PHOTO: SCREENGRAB FROM NATIONAL ARCHIVES SINGAPORE

2. View a short clip called English For You: Old Singapore, produced by the Curriculum Development Institute of Singapore.


English For You: Old Singapore, produced by the Curriculum Development Institute of Singapore. PHOTO: SCREENGRAB FROM NATIONAL ARCHIVES SINGAPORE

In 1967, education minister Ong Pang Boon, inaugurated Singapore's Educational Television service. The first educational video was on the subject of mathematics. Over the next two decades, programmes on a variety of subjects such as geography, history and science were broadcasted over national television from 7.50am to 5.30pm every week day.

Read

In the 1860s, tigers roamed freely in Singapore. This resulted in several human deaths. Read what Singapore's commissioner of police requested of Straits Settlement officials in a handwritten letter dated Nov 30, 1863.

Source: National Archives of Singapore