Videos to spur more to avert work accidents

Campaign aims to reduce falls from height, amputations and on-site vehicular accidents

A worker spots a spill on a kitchen floor and ponders - clean it up or leave it there?

He mops it up. And by doing so, he ensures the workplace is safe for himself and his colleagues.

Three videos, depicting scenarios where workers do their part to prevent workplace accidents, will be launched tomorrow as part of this year's National Workplace Safety and Health campaign.

The focus of this year's campaign, organised by the Workplace Safety and Health (WSH) Council, is on preventing falls from height, injuries resulting in amputation, and on-site vehicular accidents - the top three types of workplace accidents in 2016.

Last year, there were 13 deaths due to fall from heights, 12 who were hit and killed by moving vehicles at workplaces, and 143 cases that resulted in amputations.

The public can also learn more about preventing other accidents through new online e-learning modules targeted at students and adults. They include topics such as safety at home and at play, traffic safety for kids, and slips, trips and falls among adults. The courses are accessible on the WSH Council's website.

Between April 24 and 29, over 100 companies and associations, together with their senior management, will conduct walkabouts at their workplaces to observe work activities and spot hazards. This is the first such initiative organised by the WSH Council.

"We must believe that every workplace injury and ill health is preventable, and take preventive action at our workplaces," said the council's chairman Heng Chiang Gnee at the Sports Hub's OCBC Square yesterday, where the campaign was launched.

National Trades Union Congress secretary-general Chan Chun Sing highlighted experienced workers as being most at risk of getting into accidents, and hence need constant reminders about workplace safety.

"These are the people who believe 'I have done it so many times... accidents may happen but it won't be me'," he said. "This is something we have to remind all our workers day in, day out. The more experienced they are, the more difficult it is for the message to sink in."

A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Sunday Times on April 23, 2017, with the headline 'Videos to spur more to avert work accidents'. Print Edition | Subscribe