Two-time cancer survivor writes in aid of research

Author's proceeds from the sale of the book by Mr Chang (above) will be donated to the National Cancer Centre.
Author's proceeds from the sale of the book by Mr Chang (above) will be donated to the National Cancer Centre.

Mr Cayden Chang is 44 and has survived two bouts of kidney cancer.

He survived Stage 2 of the cancer in 2010, after doctors removed a tumour from his left kidney.

Then, two years ago, during a medical review at the National Cancer Centre, he suffered a relapse and was diagnosed with Stage 4 kidney cancer. Cancerous cells had spread to his ureter and he underwent a second operation in September 2014 to remove them.

"I knew one day it might happen. But a portion of my mind is trying to convince myself that I can't be that unlucky," he said.

Mr Chang, director and founder of Mind Kinesis Management International, lost 5kg during the relapse. But his second encounter with the disease inspired him to write a book, which took him six months last year to complete.

The Book Of Hope shares personal anecdotes about his battle with cancer - including how he had lost his mother to terminal lung cancer in 1997.

Its launch, which will be held at Chen Fu Ji restaurant on Thursday, has already raised more than $10,000 from ticket sales to about 60 guests. All proceeds from the ticket sales will be donated to the Singapore Cord Blood Bank.

"When the doctor told me I had Stage 4 cancer, what I wanted was a hope - it could be anything," said Mr Chang, who is healthy now, though he added it is "hard to tell" if he has fully recovered, or whether another relapse might occur.

"Even if I had to climb a mountain to get it, I would. Cord blood will save a patient with terminal blood disease. So if somebody has a blood disease, cord blood is that only hope."

All the author's proceeds from the sale of the book will be donated to the National Cancer Centre for cancer research, he added.

Some 2,000 copies have been printed and he hopes to raise $20,000 from book sales.

"I am counting my days. Today, I am extra mindful of the time I have left and this has increased the sense of urgency to make a difference," he said.

"If I have any small little dreams, I'd better shift them forward and fulfil them right now."

A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on January 11, 2016, with the headline 'Two-time cancer survivor writes in aid of research'. Print Edition | Subscribe