'Collision? What collision?': Motorist accused of rear-ending taxi claims there was no crash

The cabby (above) taking photos of his vehicle during the incident. Mr Chia Hock Herng, the Audi driver accused of rear-ending the taxi, said the cabby got out of his vehicle and appeared to want to help, but later claimed his taxi was hit.
The cabby (above) taking photos of his vehicle during the incident. Mr Chia Hock Herng, the Audi driver accused of rear-ending the taxi, said the cabby got out of his vehicle and appeared to want to help, but later claimed his taxi was hit.PHOTOS: ROSELINE FONG
Mr Chia's wife, Ms Roseline Fong, has posted photos in a blog showing the seeming lack of damage to the taxi (left), whose driver had accused the Audi (middle) of rear-ending it. Other photos (below) showed the apparent distance between the two vehic
Mr Chia's wife, Ms Roseline Fong, has posted photos in a blog showing the seeming lack of damage to the taxi (above), whose driver had accused the Audi of rear-ending it. Other photos showed the apparent distance between the two vehicles in the incident.
The cabby (above) taking photos of his vehicle during the incident. Mr Chia Hock Herng, the Audi driver accused of rear-ending the taxi, said the cabby got out of his vehicle and appeared to want to help, but later claimed his taxi was hit.
Mr Chia's wife, Ms Roseline Fong, has posted photos in a blog showing the seeming lack of damage to the taxi, whose driver had accused the Audi (above) of rear-ending it. Other photos showed the apparent distance between the two vehicles in the incident.PHOTOS: ROSELINE FONG
The cabby (above) taking photos of his vehicle during the incident. Mr Chia Hock Herng, the Audi driver accused of rear-ending the taxi, said the cabby got out of his vehicle and appeared to want to help, but later claimed his taxi was hit.
Mr Chia's wife, Ms Roseline Fong, has posted photos in a blog showing the seeming lack of damage to the taxi whose driver had accused the Audi of rear-ending it. Other photos (above) showed the apparent distance between the two vehicles in the incident.PHOTOS: ROSELINE FONG

Motorist accused of rear-ending taxi claims there was no crash and goes online to tell story

SMRT Taxis is seeking more than $2,000 in losses after one of its cabbies claimed to have been rear-ended by a car on the Central Expressway (CTE) in July.

But the other motorist said no such collision with the taxi took place, and has pictures to prove his case.

While it is now being investigated by MSIG Insurance, the driver of the car, corporate trainer Chia Hock Herng, 43, and his wife Roseline Fong, who is in her early 40s, have recently aired their side of the story on a blog.

MSIG Insurance is Mr Chia's insurer. He told The Straits Times last week that the cabby had hit the brakes suddenly while Mr Chia was driving his Audi at about 70kmh on the CTE heading north, before the Moulmein exit, at around 9pm on July 6. While he said he managed to stop and avoid a collision with the taxi, a Honda Stream behind Mr Chia hit his car, scratching the Audi's rear bumper.

Mr Chia said he settled the repairs privately with the Honda driver, Mr Ken Ang, 37, for about $250. A week after the incident, Mr Chia was informed by MSIG that an accident report had been made against him.

Earlier this month, he received a $2,114 claim from SMRT Taxis, sent to MSIG. Recounting the events that evening, Mr Chia said that the cabby also got out of his vehicle, appearing to want to help them, but later claimed his taxi was hit.

"When we asked him to check for damage, he said it was for his workshop to decide."

It prompted Mr Chia to file a police report that night.

UP TO WORKSHOP

When we asked him to check for damages, he said it was for his workshop to decide.

MR CHIA HOCK HERNG, on the cabby's response after the incident.

Mr Chia said he met a surveyor sent by MSIG on Oct 24, and is hoping that his insurer will not pay out the claims.

"It's ridiculous. The pictures speak for themselves. There was no damage," he said.

His car is not installed with an in-car video camera.

Photos posted by Ms Fong on the blog claims to show the condition of all three vehicles, and the taxi appears to be unscathed in the pictures.

SMRT Taxis' claim includes $1,450 for repairs and about $420 for the loss of taxi rental, due to the vehicle being out of service for four days.

The cabby, who has not been identified, is also making a claim of $240 for loss of income.

MSIG told ST that it is unable to comment as investigations are ongoing, but said it takes a proactive approach to deter and detect suspected fraud cases.

VIGILANT

The claims team is trained to be vigilant and to exercise due diligence in ensuring validity and consistency of claims paid out. 

AN MSIG SPOKESMAN

"The claims team is trained to be vigilant and to exercise due diligence in ensuring validity and consistency of claims paid out," the spokesman added.

Mr Ang said he did not see any damage done to either the taxi or the front of Mr Chia's car, when he was assessing the conditions of the vehicles that night. "It can't be. "The taxi was more than half a metre away from Mr Chia's car," the sales engineer said.

A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on November 02, 2017, with the headline ''Collision? What collision?''. Print Edition | Subscribe