Better, sharper 'eyes' at junctions

The surveillance cameras known as J-Eyes were first installed in 1999 and are reaching the end of their lifespans. They will be replaced with new high-definition digital cameras which will give sharper images and better zooming power.
The surveillance cameras known as J-Eyes were first installed in 1999 and are reaching the end of their lifespans. They will be replaced with new high-definition digital cameras which will give sharper images and better zooming power. ST FILE PHOTO

LTA calls for tender to upgrade 319 junction cameras, add 100 new ones

SURVEILLANCE cameras at road junctions are set to become more high-tech, to give the authorities a better view of traffic incidents.

The Land Transport Authority (LTA) has called a tender on Tuesday to upgrade the 319 cameras under its Junction Electronic Eyes System (J-Eyes), as well as to install cameras at 100 new locations.

They include the junctions of Cecil Street and Cross Street, Upper Cross Sqtreet and South Bridge Road; and Hill Street and Coleman Street. This will bring the total number of locations where J-eyes are used to 388.

Most of the current cameras, which were installed as early as in 1999 when the J-Eyes system was first implemented, are reaching the end of their lifespans, said the LTA.

"Under this new contract, all existing cameras will be upgraded to newer HD (high-definition) digital cameras, which will give sharper images and more zooming power," said its spokesman.

This could allow officers viewing such footage to, for example, better identify the type of debris in the event of a vehicle spill. Currently, cameras can pan 360 degrees horizontally, tilt up and down, and have zoom capabilities of about 22 times.

J-Eyes cameras are mounted on poles, lamp posts and traffic light posts at strategic road junctions, such as along major arterial roads, and the entrance and exit points along major expressways.

The real-time footage is fed to the LTA's Intelligent Transport Systems Centre in River Valley Road where LTA employees are on duty round the clock. Through them, the authorities are able to assess and respond to incidents quickly, and keep traffic moving smoothly, said the LTA.

Before the J-Eyes were implemented, officers had to be constantly dispatched to the scene, or the authorities would have to rely on alerts from the public. The project to upgrade and install new cameras is expected to be completed within the next few years after it has been awarded.

adrianl@sph.com.sg

A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on June 19, 2015, with the headline 'Better, sharper 'eyes' at junctions'. Print Edition | Subscribe