Think global, act local for national security: DPM Teo Chee Hean

Measures to tackle global threats, such as that of Islamic State in Iraq and Syria (ISIS) militant group, must be adapted to suit the local context, said Deputy Prime Minister Teo Chee Hean on Monday. -- PHOTO: ZAOBAO  
Measures to tackle global threats, such as that of Islamic State in Iraq and Syria (ISIS) militant group, must be adapted to suit the local context, said Deputy Prime Minister Teo Chee Hean on Monday. -- PHOTO: ZAOBAO  

SINGAPORE: Measures to tackle global threats, such as that of Islamic State in Iraq and Syria (ISIS) militant group, must be adapted to suit the local context, said Deputy Prime Minister Teo Chee Hean on Monday.

Speaking at the opening ceremony of the Asia Pacific Programme for Senior National Security Officers, DPM Teo, who is also Home Affairs Minister and Coordinating Minister for National Security, said: "We live in a world where local and global developments are intrinsically linked...We therefore need to be keenly aware of global developments, understand what they mean for the local context, and act accordingly."

For example, when a threat or problem arise in other parts of the world, "we should ask ourselves what it means for us...and how we can be prepared for something similar", said DPM Teo.

The Asia Pacific Programme for Senior National Security Officers is organised by the Centre of Excellence for National Security, at the S. Rajaratnam School of International Studies, with support from the National Security Coordination Secretariat in the Prime Minister's Office.

About 80 participants from 27 countries including Singapore, Australia and the United States will discuss topics such as national identify and new trends in radicialisation at the five-day event held at Marina Mandarin Hotel.

Ambassador Ong Keng Yong, executive deputy chairman of the S. Rajaratnam School of International Studies said: "We cannot always assume that what works in one location will suffice as a solution in a different place. But that is why networking, and sharing ideas and experiences, is so necessary between national security practitioners."