Stray dogs in Pasir Ris Camp growing 'increasingly aggressive': Army

Four of the dogs allegedly abused at Pasir Ris camp are pictured on Feb 24, 2014. The Army has said its Pasir Ris camp has suffered a series of attacks by "increasingly aggressive" stray dogs, after punishing a full-time National Serviceman who filme
Four of the dogs allegedly abused at Pasir Ris camp are pictured on Feb 24, 2014. The Army has said its Pasir Ris camp has suffered a series of attacks by "increasingly aggressive" stray dogs, after punishing a full-time National Serviceman who filmed one strung up in a camp bathroom so it could not move. -- ST FILE PHOTO: LAU FOOK KONG

The Army has said its Pasir Ris camp has suffered a series of attacks by "increasingly aggressive" stray dogs, after punishing a full-time National Serviceman who filmed one strung up in a camp bathroom so it could not move.

Its Facebook post at midnight on Tuesday said there were six such attacks in December alone - four involving injuries to personnel.

The previous day it had confirmed that the NSF who filmed the video then sent it to Animal Lovers League's founder Cathy Strong had been given 21 days suspension of leave and ordered to check in regularly with military police.

On Tuesday evening the 19-year-old NSF's father Mr Simon Spencer, 52, slammed his son's punishment for charges of unauthorised videography and unauthorised disclosure of information. In a Facebook post he said that before Ms Strong revealed his son's name to the Ministry of Defence (Mindef), she was "assured by Mindef" that "no charges will be pressed against the army personnel involved in taking the video".

Ms Strong confirmed this with The Straits Times in a phone interview.

Mr Spencer wrote: "It is clear that Mindef did not keep to their word to Cathy when two officers informed me that my son will be charged."

Mindef declined to comment on this. An investigation by Mindef and the Agri-Food and Veterinary Authority of Singapore ruled that allegations of dog abuse, purportedly committed by the NSF's lieutenant colonel and warrant officer, were unfounded.

 After the Army's first post about the recent dog attacks drew criticism from netizens, it then posted a picture of one female victim's leg, showing four puncture wounds and bruising. 

The Army added: "The dogs were unpredictable and a persistent danger to personnel. Commanders, who have a duty of care for their personnel, tried to chase the dogs out of the camp. Unfortunately, they remain a danger. The unit contacted AVA and was advised to contain the dogs and hand them over to AVA... The dogs were never abused."

It added that the NSF who took the video "violated camp security regulations", adding: "These are serious offences and he was punished for (them)."

The Straits Times understands the lieutenant-colonel and warrant officer involved have been referred for counselling. The NSF began serving his punishment on Monday.

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