Some private-sector firms already doing their part to go green

Even before the public sector unveiled its plans to reduce its electricity and water usage as an example to others, some companies in the private sector had already embarked on green initiatives of their own.

For example, property firm CapitaLand launched its second electronic waste collection drive across seven of its office properties in April.

Its first four-month drive last year yielded over 7,000kg of e-waste, including computers, monitors and music players.

The firm also rolled out e-waste recycling bins across 10 of its malls here last August.

The public sector earlier this month unveiled an action plan to use 15 per cent less electricity and 5 per cent less water by 2020 compared with 2013 levels, hoping to spur businesses and individuals to follow suit.

It will also set a green standard for its new buildings, buy more green electronics and paper products for its offices, and recycle food waste on public- sector premises, among other moves.

More than 20 of real estate firm Frasers Centrepoint Singapore's portfolio - including shopping malls Waterway Point, Causeway Point, Valley Point and Bedok Point - have received the Green Mark Award from the Building and Construction Authority for their environmentally sustainable designs.


An e-waste recycling bin at CapitaLand's Raffles City shopping mall. CapitaLand also launched its second e-waste collection drive across seven of its office properties in April. PHOTO: CAPITALAND

The malls are fitted with efficient LED lighting at common areas such as staircases, carparks and toilets. Some toilets have motion sensor-controlled lighting and energy-efficient air-conditioning systems.

  • 10

    Number of CapitaLand's malls in Singapore where e-waste recycling bins were rolled out last August.

    $250k

    Amount Shangri-La Hotel will save each year after it replaced the air-cooled chillers in its serviced apartments with more energy-efficient water-cooled ones last December.

Waterway Point in Punggol also features regenerative lift systems to conserve energy.

It also has "extensive greenery that keeps the development cool, providing soothing spaces for customers", said Mr Lee Choon Li, Frasers' general manager of projects.

He added: "We also strive to collaborate with our tenants and shoppers to conserve water and energy where possible."

In May, Shangri-La Hotel switched the bulbs in its guest rooms to energy-saving LED bulbs, which saves it $12,000 each year.

Last December, the property replaced the air-cooled chillers in its serviced apartments with more energy-efficient water-cooled chillers. This saves it $250,000 each year.

Shangri-La Hotel's director of communications Lesley Tan said: "Our belief is that going green is a decision that makes sense holistically - from business, social and environmental standpoints."

Cinema operator Golden Village said it will announce its sustainability plan later this year, having focused on cinema etiquette over the past few years.

A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on June 27, 2017, with the headline 'Some private-sector firms already doing their part to go green'. Print Edition | Subscribe