SGH honours those who use CPR to save cardiac arrest victims

Mr Kelvin Lee was participating in a treasure hunt with some friends on Sentosa island in June last year when he suddenly collapsed while crossing the road. His friends thought he was playing a prank on them but when he did not respond, they panicked.

Sentosa beach patrol officer Muhammad Yazid, 28, who was on duty, rushed over to administer cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and use the automated external defibrillator (AED). By the time an ambulance arrived, the 32-year-old had regained a normal heartbeat.

On Monday, Mr Yazid was among the 79 people honoured at the inaugural Survivor Awards which recognises individuals who play a role in resuscitating cardiac arrest victims.

About 1,500 people suffer from cardiac arrest in Singapore every year but only 3 per cent survive. Associate Professor Marcus Ong, senior consultant at SGH noted that that statistic could be increased if more bystanders administered CPR or used the automated external defibrillator. A victim's chance of survival increases by two to three times with bystander CPR treatment.