SAF soldier among passers-by who helped man injured by wild boar at Hillview

CPT Nicholas Aw Zhong Wen helped by adding bandages and helping a paramedic carry the man who had been injured by a wild boar to the ambulance.
CPT Nicholas Aw Zhong Wen helped by adding bandages and helping a paramedic carry the man who had been injured by a wild boar to the ambulance.PHOTOS: FACEBOOK / THE SINGAPORE ARMY

SINGAPORE - A soldier with the Singapore Armed Forces was among people who rushed to help a man injured by a wild boar on Thursday (Oct 19).

CPT Nicholas Aw Zhong Wen was driving back to camp when he saw three to four people crowding around the injured man on the pavement, The Singapore Army said in a Facebook post on Friday (Oct 20).

CPT Aw, who is from the 9th Battalion in the Singapore Infantry Regiment, noticed that the man was writhing in pain.

He parked his car and rushed over with his first aid kit.

The 44-year-old victim, identified only as Mr Jin, had been charged at by the wild boar outside a condominium at 25, Hillview Avenue.

 

When CPT Aw arrived, Mr Jin was already being attended to by passer-by Raymond Chan.

Mr Chan, who works in the Ministry of Defence, was bandaging Mr Jin's leg.

 

CPT Aw helped by adding bandages and helping a paramedic carry Mr Jin to the ambulance. He was taken to Ng Teng Fong General Hospital. The wild boar was hit by a bus in its escape and died.

"The call to serve for any SAF soldier exists not just within our camps but in our everyday lives," wrote the Singapore Army. "The Singapore Army would like to wish the injured man a speedy recovery and commend our servicemen for being ready to step forward when required."

Chua Chu Kang GRC MP Low Yen Ling previously said Mr Jin's condition is stable.

She said she is working closely with the Agri-Food and Veterinary Authority (AVA), the National Parks Board, the Land Transport Authority and Acres, an animal protection and rescue organisation, to look into the safety of the residents, pedestrians and motorists.

"AVA has agreed to mobilise more resources to step up surveillance in the area," she added. This could involve deploying more staff on the ground to monitor the wild boar situation.