Probing 'secrets' of the black box

Aircraft flight recorders - commonly referred to as black boxes - that are damaged in accidents can now be analysed in Singapore. This is after the Transport Safety Investigation Bureau (TSIB), which investigates air and maritime incidents, recently
ST PHOTO: ARIFFIN JAMAR

Aircraft flight recorders - commonly referred to as black boxes - that are damaged in accidents can now be analysed in Singapore. This is after the Transport Safety Investigation Bureau (TSIB), which investigates air and maritime incidents, recently acquired new capabilities in a bid to boost its expertise. The recorders, usually orange in colour rather than black, are taken apart before being scrutinised, said the TSIB's deputy director (air safety investigation) Michael Alan Toft (above). They contain cockpit voice recordings and other data critical for air investigations. The work is done at the TSIB's office at Changi Airport where Captain Kunal Nakra, TSIB deputy director (marine safety investigation), oversees a small but growing team that handles maritime incidents.

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A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on January 18, 2017, with the headline 'Probing 'secrets' of the black box'. Print Edition | Subscribe