Parliament: Licences of 69 drivers revoked for driving with disabilities or diseases that affect safety

The driving licenses of 69 drivers were revoked over the past four years after they were found to have disabilities or diseases that impede their driving abilities.
The driving licenses of 69 drivers were revoked over the past four years after they were found to have disabilities or diseases that impede their driving abilities.PHOTO: ST FILE

SINGAPORE - The driving licenses of 69 drivers were revoked over the past four years after they were found to have disabilities or diseases that impeded their driving abilities.

Parliamentary Secretary for Home Affairs Amrin Amin told the House on Tuesday (Jan 10) that drivers' licences are revoked if they fail medical examinations after they were involved in accidents or other investigations.

Of the 69 cases, 12 were drivers involved in accidents due to their conditions, he said.

He was responding to questions from Mr Murali Pillai (Bukit Batok) on whether the Traffic Police intends to require drivers and medical professionals to report cases where drivers develop diseases or disabilities which could affect their driving safety.

Mr Amrin said the Ministry of Home Affairs will study the practices of other countries and see what the best options for Singapore are.

"Not many countries currently compel medical doctors to report such disabilities and diseases to the traffic authority, and requiring individuals to report such disabilities and diseases on their own may have limited effect practically," he said.

"We have to be mindful that our regulations strike a balance in ensuring that drivers continue to be fit to drive on the roads, without imposing overly onerous reporting requirements," he added.

Currently, people applying for provisional driving licences have to declare that they are medically fit, and drivers aged 65 and above have to undergo medical examinations.

The list of disabilities and diseases under the Road Traffic (Motor Vehicles, Driving Licences) Rules includes mental disorders and epilepsy, and was last reviewed in 2015.

Mr Amrin said that drivers with such conditions who drive and are involved in accidents would be liable under the Penal Code for having committed a negligent or rash act.