Parliament: 'Collective action' needed despite differences in perspectives, says Seah Kian Peng

While Singaporeans might have different ideas about what is best for the country, they should not lose sight of the need to have a "collective vision", Mr Seah Kian Peng, MP for Marine Parade GRC, said in Parliament on May 28, 2014. -- PHOTO: ST FILE
While Singaporeans might have different ideas about what is best for the country, they should not lose sight of the need to have a "collective vision", Mr Seah Kian Peng, MP for Marine Parade GRC, said in Parliament on May 28, 2014. -- PHOTO: ST FILE 

SINGAPORE - While Singaporeans might have different ideas about what is best for the country, they should not lose sight of the need to have a "collective vision", said Mr Seah Kian Peng.

Singapore's progress has largely been a result of collective action, but "it is clear that such collective action will be very much more difficult in the future", said the MP for Marine Parade GRC in Parliament on Wednesday.

"We all want what is good for Singapore but the trouble is, we don't all think "good" is just one thing," he added.

Even as Singaporeans - including politicians - make suggestions for the betterment of the country, they should be "undertaking this exercise in good faith that we work for the collective good, and not personal gain", Mr Seah said.

Political leaders also bear an "additional duty" not just to live an ethical life, but also shape the larger morality and "steer a course that stays true to the values of Singaporeans".

"Not economics, not even policies, but to recognise and shape the collective morality for Singapore - this is the real challenge of 2030," he said.

"Collective action can only be possible when we see each other as fellow Singaporeans working for the larger good, not vote-grubbing politicians seeking popular advantage."

In his speech, Mr Seah also asked for the removal of the Primary School Leaving Examination (PSLE), calling it "an exam that has passed its time".

"Why do we insist on a narrow and insular measure of educational abilities and potentials for 12 year olds when the demands and entry requirements for tertiary education already make such tests obsolete?"

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