Generation Grit: Not losing sight of her dreams despite her loss of vision

Ms Amanda Chong was born with congenital cataracts. At 17, she became blind and had to relearn everyday tasks. Today, she works at the Ministry of Social and Family Development and leads an active social life.
Ms Amanda Chong, 25, lost her full sight to glaucoma when she was 17. A senior executive at the Ministry of Social and Family Development, she feels her experience helps her to improve policies for people with disabilities.
Ms Amanda Chong, 25, lost her full sight to glaucoma when she was 17. A senior executive at the Ministry of Social and Family Development, she feels her experience helps her to improve policies for people with disabilities.ST PHOTO: GIN TAY

The thought of losing one's sight completely is terrifying for many people. But Amanda Chong discovered it was nowhere near the end of the world. This is the latest in a series on millennials who inspire us.

When Ms Amanda Chong suddenly went blind at the age of 17, it felt like a cruel April Fool's joke.

On April 1, 2011, the then Pioneer Junior College student was in class when she suffered a terrible migraine that left her dizzy and wanting to throw up. Then the world went pitch black.

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A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on March 26, 2020, with the headline 'Not losing sight of her dreams despite her loss of vision'. Print Edition | Subscribe