New tie-up to drive entrepreneurship among students with physical disabilities

The Society for the Physically Disabled on Jan 11, 2014, announced a new collaboration with the Spirit of Enterprise to help drive entrepreneurship among its student beneficiaries. -- ST FILE PHOTO: KEVIN LIM
The Society for the Physically Disabled on Jan 11, 2014, announced a new collaboration with the Spirit of Enterprise to help drive entrepreneurship among its student beneficiaries. -- ST FILE PHOTO: KEVIN LIM

The Society for the Physically Disabled (SPD) on Saturday announced a new collaboration with the Spirit of Enterprise to help drive entrepreneurship among its student beneficiaries.

The Spirit of Enterprise is a non-profit organisation set up in 2003 to promote entrepreneurship in Singapore. "Our students will have the opportunity to gain similar exposure through practical experience and networking opportunities with professionals and local entrepreneurs," said SPD president Chia Yong Yong, who was speaking at the society's Education Programme awards presentation ceremony held at The Gallery of Traders Hotel.

This year, the SPD recognised two physically disabled youth for their resilience in pursuing interests in visual and performing arts outside their studies. Some 97 physically disabled students and youths with parents who have physical disabilities, received $76,050 in bursaries under the education programme.

Ms Chia also said in her welcome address that two SPD student beneficiaries will be able to participate in an outdoor camp conducted by Outward Bound Singapore at the end of the year.

Permanent Secretary at the Ministry of Social and Family Development. Mr Chan Heng Kee, who was also speaking at the event, said he had three wishes for 2014.

First, he hoped for continued progress on the Enabling Masterplan, a national blueprint for policies and programmes aimed at building a more inclusive society for persons with disabilities.

Next, he hoped that SG Enable, the agency established by MSF in 2013 to enable persons with disabilities, will work with voluntary welfare groups and "play a useful role". "I believe that both these hopes are worthy goals. They are also challenging ones - we still have much room to go," he said.

Lastly, he hoped for stronger partnerships among government, corporate, community and families, "with each offering their resource and know-how to make Singapore a more inclusive society for persons with disabilities".

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